Tales of Glauber-spa, Volume 2

Front Cover
William Cullen Bryant
J. & J. Harper, 1832 - 276 pages
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 12 - This is the prettiest low-born lass that ever Ran on the green-sward : nothing she does or seems But smacks of something greater than herself, Too noble for this place.
Page 121 - Above me are the Alps, The palaces of Nature, whose vast walls Have pinnacled in clouds their snowy scalps, And throned Eternity in icy halls Of cold sublimity, where forms and falls The avalanche — the thunderbolt of snow ! All that expands the spirit, yet appals, Gather around these summits, as to show How Earth may pierce to Heaven, yet leave vain man below.
Page 79 - Falsely luxurious, will not man awake; And, springing from the bed of sloth, enjoy The cool, the fragrant, and the silent hour To meditation due and sacred song? For is there aught in sleep can charm the wise? To lie in dead oblivion, losing half •The fleeting moments of too short a life; Total extinction of th
Page 231 - There is a river, the streams whereof make glad the city of God, The holy place of the tabernacles of the Most High.
Page 19 - These words did say : In the touch of this bosom there worketh a spell Which is lord of thy utterance, Christabel ! Thou knowest to-night, and wilt know to-morrow This mark of my shame, this seal of my sorrow...
Page 13 - Between the acting of a dreadful thing And the first motion, all the interim is Like a phantasma, or a hideous dream : The genius, and the mortal instruments, Are then in council; and the state of man, Like to a little kingdom, suffers then The nature of an insurrection.
Page 26 - And thence delight, disgust, or cool indiff'rence rise: When minds are joyful, then we look around, And what is seen is all on fairy ground ; Again they sicken, and on every view Cast their own dull and melancholy...
Page 19 - And found'st a bright lady, surpassingly fair; And didst bring her home with thee in love and in charity, To shield her and shelter her from the damp air.

Bibliographic information