Sheridan: A Biography, Volume 1

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R. Bentley and Son, 1896 - Dramatists, English - 873 pages
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Page 34 - I allowed him all his own merit." He now added, " Sheridan cannot bear me. I bring his declamation to a point. I ask him a plain question, ' What do you mean to teach?' Besides, sir, what influence can Mr. Sheridan have upon the language of this great country, by his narrow exertions ? Sir, it is burning a farthing candle at Dover, to show light at Calais.
Page 81 - At eight in the morning we go in dishabille to the pumproom, which is crowded like a Welsh fair...
Page 300 - This bottle's the sun of our table, His beams are rosy wine ; We, planets, that are not able Without his help to shine. Let mirth and glee abound ! You'll soon grow bright With borrow'd light, And shine as he goes round.
Page 13 - I need only tell you, that this ill-starred, good-natured, improvident man returned to Dublin, unhinged from all favour at court, and even banished from the castle. But still he remained a punster, a quibbler, a fiddler, and a wit. Not a day passed without a rebus, an anagram, or a madrigal. His pen and his fiddle-stick were in continual motion; and yet to little or no purpose...
Page 341 - Linley was with her ; she is very handsome, but nothing near her sister: the elegance of Mrs. Sheridan's beauty is unequalled by any I ever saw, except Mrs. Crewe.* I was pleased with her in all respects. She is much more lively and agreeable than I had any idea of finding her: she was very gay, and very unaffected, and totally free from airs of any kind.
Page 171 - Mr. Richard S having attempted, in a letter left behind him for that purpose, to account for his scandalous method of running away from this place, by insinuations derogating from my character...
Page 81 - I have of his tenderness and affection. Hard by the pump-room is a coffee-house for the ladies ; but my aunt says, young girls are not admitted, inasmuch as the conversation turns upon politics, scandal, philosophy, and other subjects above our capacity...
Page 327 - When an old bachelor marries a young wife, what is he to expect ? 'Tis now six months since Lady Teazle made me the happiest of men — and I have been the most miserable dog ever since ! We tiffed a little going to church, and fairly quarrelled before the bells had done ringing.
Page 80 - ... intoxicated with pride, vanity and presumption. Knowing no other criterion of greatness but the ostentation of wealth, they discharge their affluence without taste or conduct, through every channel of the most absurd extravagance ; and all of them hurry to Bath, because here, without any farther qualification, they can mingle with the princes and nobles of the land.
Page 274 - from play to study; never be doing nothing' — I say, 'Frequently be unemployed; sit and think.' There are on every subject but a few leading and fixed ideas; their tracks may be traced by your own genius as well as by reading. — a man of deep thought, who shall have accustomed himself to support or attack all he has read, will soon find nothing new: thought is exercise, and the mind, like the body, must not be wearied.

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