The Doctor in History, Literature, Folk-lore, Etc

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Andrews & Company, 1896 - Medicine - 287 pages
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Page 187 - He who hath bent him o'er the dead Ere the first day of death is fled, The first dark day of nothingness, The last of danger and distress (Before Decay's effacing fingers Have swept the lines where beauty lingers), And marked the mild, angelic air, The rapture of repose that's there...
Page 76 - For nought so vile that on the earth doth live, But to the earth some special good doth give...
Page 19 - Being asked if he could remember Queen Anne, — " He had (he said) a confused, but somehow a sort of solemn recollection of a lady in diamonds, and a long black hood."* This touch, however, was without any effect.
Page 258 - When the ear heard me, then it blessed me : and when the eye saw me, it gave witness to me : because I delivered the poor that cried, and the fatherless, and him that had none to help him. The blessing of him that was ready to perish came upon me ; and I caused the widow's heart to sing for joy.
Page 187 - And — but for that sad shrouded eye, That fires not, wins not, weeps not now, And but for that chill, changeless brow, Where cold Obstruction's apathy Appalls the gazing mourner's heart...
Page 108 - The smooth, soft air with pulse-like waves Flows murmuring through its hidden caves, Whose streams of brightening purple rush, Fired with a new and livelier blush, While all their burden of decay The ebbing current steals away, And red with Nature's flame they start From the warm fountains of the heart. No rest that throbbing slave may ask, Forever quivering o'er his task, While far and wide a crimson jet Leaps forth to fill the woven net Which in unnumbered crossing tides The flood of burning life...
Page 219 - A principal fruit of Friendship is, the ease and discharge of the fulness and swellings of the heart, which passions of all kinds do cause and induce. We know diseases of stoppings and suffocations are the most dangerous in the body, and it is not much otherwise in the mind...
Page 257 - Herostratus lives that burnt the temple of Diana, he is almost lost that built it ; Time hath spared the epitaph of Adrian's horse, confounded that of himself. In vain we compute our felicities by the advantage of our good names, since bad have...
Page 28 - A gentleman entered the room bearing a rod, and along with him another who had a table-cloth, which, after they had both kneeled three times with the utmost veneration, he spread upon the table, and, after kneeling again, they both retired. Then came two others, one with the rod again, the other with a...
Page 29 - At the end of all this ceremonial a number of unmarried ladies appeared, who, with particular solemnity, lifted the meat off the, table, and conveyed it into the queen's inner and more private chamber, where, after she had chosen for herself, the rest goes to the ladies of the court.

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