Sheridan

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Macmillan, 1883 - Dramatists, English - 210 pages
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Page 140 - The popular harangue, the tart reply, The logic, and the wisdom, and the wit, And the loud laugh— I long to know them all ; I burn to set the imprisoned wranglers free, And give them voice and utterance once again.
Page 144 - But neither the culprit nor his advocates attracted so much notice as the accusers. In the midst of the blaze of red drapery, a space had been fitted up with green benches and tables for the Commons. The managers, with Burke at their head, appeared in full dress.
Page 65 - Your charms would make me true. To you no soul shall bear deceit, No stranger offer wrong ; But friends in all the aged you'll meet, And lovers in the young.
Page 84 - Tis very true. She generally designs well, has a free tongue and a bold invention ; but her colouring is too dark, and her outlines often extravagant. She wants that delicacy of tint, and mellowness of sneer, which distinguishes your ladyship's scandal.
Page 36 - Ask'st thou how long my love will stay, When all that's new is past? How long, ah Delia, can I say How long my life will last? Dry be that tear, be hush'd that sigh, At least I'll love thee till I die: Hush'd be that sigh.
Page 202 - ... things settled so that 150/. will remove all difficulty. I am absolutely undone and broken-hearted. I shall negotiate for the Plays successfully in the course of a week, when all shall be returned. I have desired Fairbrother to get back the Guarantee for thirty.
Page 111 - ... em pass for their own. Sneer. But your present work is a sacrifice to Melpomene, and he, you know, never Sir Fret. That's no security : a dexterous plagiarist may do anything. Why, sir, for aught I know, he might take out some of the best things in my tragedy, and put them into his own comedy.
Page 142 - All that he had ever heard - all that he had ever read - when compared with it dwindled into nothing, and vanished like vapour before the sun.
Page 139 - Honourable Gentleman, the elegant sallies of his thought, the gay effusions of his fancy, his dramatic turns and his epigrammatic point; and if they were reserved for the proper stage, they would, no doubt, receive what the Honourable Gentleman's abilities always did receive, the plaudits of the audience; and it would be his fortune "sui plauau gaudsre theatri." But this was not the proper scene for the exhibition of those elegancies.
Page 173 - They, by a strange frenzy driven, fight for power, for plunder, and extended rule : we, for our country, our altars, and our homes. They follow an adventurer whom they fear, and obey a power which they hate : we serve a monarch whom we love — a God whom we adore.

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