The Works of Laurence Sterne ...

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J. Johnson, 1803 - English literature
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Page 13 - ... so long as a man rides his HobbyHorse peaceably and quietly along the King's highway, and neither compels you or me to get up behind him, — pray, Sir, what have either you or I to do with it?
Page 139 - He stood before them with his body swayed and bent forwards, just so far as to make an angle of 85 degrees and a half upon the plain of the horizon...
Page 82 - By this contrivance the machinery of my work is of a species by itself; two contrary motions are introduced into it, and reconciled, which were thought to be at variance with each other. In a word, my work is digressive, and it is progressive too, — and at the same time.
Page 97 - Sir, (which. may possibly recommend it to the world) of what passes in a man's own mind ; and if you will say so much of the book, and no more, believe me, you will cut no contemptible figure in a metaphysic circle.
Page 90 - And in this, Sir, I am of so nice and singular a humour, that if I thought you was able to form the least judgment or probable conjecture to yourself, of what was to come in the next page, — I would tear it out of my book.
Page 2 - Well, you may take my word, that nine parts in ten of a man's sense or his nonsense, his -successes and miscarriages in this world, depend upon their motions and activity, and the different tracks and trains you put them into...
Page 337 - I am this month one whole year older than I was this time twelve-month; and having got, as you perceive, almost into the middle of my fourth volume and no farther than to my first day's life 'tis demonstrative that I have three hundred and sixty-four days...
Page 213 - Grant me patience, just Heaven! Of all the cants which are canted in this canting world — though the cant of hypocrites may be the worst — the cant of criticism is the most tormenting!
Page 41 - For, if he is a man of the least spirit he will have fifty deviations from a straight line to make with this or that party as he goes along, which he can no ways avoid.
Page 130 - I'll not hurt a hair of thy head: — Go, says he, lifting up the sash, and opening his hand as he spoke, to let it escape; — go, poor devil, get thee gone, why should I hurt thee? This world surely is wide enough to hold both thee and me.

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