For Space

Front Cover
SAGE, Feb 18, 2005 - Science - 222 pages
4 Reviews
"The reason for my enthusiasm for this book is that Doreen Massey manages to describe a certain way of perceiving movement in space which I have been - and still am - working with on different levels in my work: i.e. the idea that space is not something static and neutral, a frozen entity, but is something intertwined with time and thus ever changing - also when we are not occupying it. Doreen's descriptions of her journey through England for example are clear and precise accounts of this idea, and she very sharply characterizes the attempts not to recognize this idea as utopian and nostalgic."
- Olafur Eliasson

In this book, Doreen Massey makes an impassioned argument for revitalising our imagination of space. She takes on some well-established assumptions from philosophy, and some familiar ways of characterising the twenty-first century world, and shows how they restrain our understanding of both the challenge and the potential of space.

The way we think about space matters. It inflects our understandings of the world, our attitudes to others, our politics. It affects, for instance, the way we understand globalisation, the way we approach cities, the way we develop, and practice, a sense of place. If time is the dimension of change then space is the dimension of the social: the contemporaneous co-existence of others. That is its challenge, and one that has been persistently evaded. For Space pursues its argument through philosophical and theoretical engagement, and through telling personal and political reflection. Doreen Massey asks questions such as how best to characterise these so-called spatial times, how it is that implicit spatial assumptions inflect our politics, and how we might develop a responsibility for place beyond place.

This book is "for space" in that it argues for a reinvigoration of the spatiality of our implicit cosmologies. For Space is essential reading for anyone interested in space and the spatial turn in the social sciences and humanities. Serious, and sometimes irreverent, it is a compelling manifesto: for re-imagining spaces for these times and facing up to their challenge.

 

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User Review  - DanielClausen - LibraryThing

As several of the reviews have already mentioned, this book is written primarily for human geographers. Perhaps the ideal audience for this book is the human geographer with a chip on his / her ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - fadedwords - LibraryThing

"For the truth is that you can never simply 'go back', to home or to anywhere else. When you get 'there' the place will have moved on just as you yourself will have changed. And this of course is the ... Read full review

Contents

Opening propositions
9
Part TwoUnpromising associations
17
The prisonhouse of synchrony
36
The horizontalities of deconstruction
49
The life in space
55
Part Three Living in spatial times?
61
Instantaneitydepthlessness
76
Elements for alternatives
99
The elusiveness of place
130
Part Five A relational politics of the spatial
147
There are no rules of space and place
163
Making and contesting timespaces
177
Notes
196
Bibliography
204
Index
217
Copyright

Part Four Reorientations
105

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About the author (2005)

Doreen Massey was born in Manchester, United Kingdom on January 3, 1944. She was educated at Oxford University and later received a master's degree in regional science at the University of Pennsylvania. She began her career working for a thinktank, the Centre for Environmental Studies (CES), in London. Her work with CES revealed several key analysts of the contemporary British economy. When CES closed, she became a professor of geography at the Open University and worked there until her retirement in 2009. She wrote and edited numerous books during her lifetime including For Space; Space, Place and Gender; and World City. She died on March 11, 2016 at the age of 72.

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