Memoirs of the court of Henry the eighth, Volume 1

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1826
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Page 160 - I shall desire you, because ye can speak French, to take the pains to go down into the hall to encounter and to receive them, according to their estates, and to conduct them into this chamber, where they shall see us, and all these noble personages sitting merrily at our banquet, desiring them to sit down with us, and to take part of our fare and pastime.
Page 360 - But if he had written everything in the most unexceptionable manner, I had no inclination to die for the sake of truth. Every man hath not the courage requisite to make a martyr ; and I am afraid that if I were put to the trial I should imitate St. Peter.
Page 436 - to be content with a more easier sum': 'to the which he currishly answered that he would rather have his tongue plucked out of his head with a pair of pinsons than to move the King to take any less sum'.
Page 317 - Then was the edge of the axe turned towards him, and he led into a barge. Sir Thomas Lovell desired him to sit on the cushins and carpet ordeined for him. He said nay ; for when I went to Westminster I was duke of Buckingham, now I am but Edward Bohune the most caitife of the world.
Page 436 - ... his hat, and great seal too ; to the intent, that if he find the like fault with us hereafter, we may be the bolder from ourselves to lay the blame on those whom his grace bringeth here with him.
Page 469 - presently deposit your hundred pounds in gold, or else no going hence all the days of your life. I have been your...
Page 97 - My Lord, I trust not the Scots, therefore I pray you be not negligent.
Page 229 - To those who are accustomed to contemplate the great picture of human follies which the unpolished ages of Europe hold up to our view, it will not appear surprising that the people who were forbidden to read the events of the sacred history in the Bible, in which they...
Page 438 - Ho ! will they not let my bill pass ?" and, laying his hand on the head of Montagu (kneeling before him), added — " Get my bill to pass by such a time to-morrow, or else by such a time this head of yours shall be off!
Page 154 - Hall, as well noblemen and other worthy gentlemen, as noblemen and gentlemen of his own family ; thus passing forth with two great crosses of silver borne before him ; with also two great pillars...

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