Post-Liberalism: Recovering a Shared World

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Oxford University Press, Apr 11, 2019 - Political Science - 208 pages
Liberal democracy is the dominant political ideology in the West today. Taken at face value it suggests an equivalency between its two central components--liberalism and democracy--but as Fred Dallmayr argues here, the two operate in very different registers. The two frequently conflict, endangering our public life.This is evident in the rise of self-centered neo-liberalism as well as autocratic movements in our world today. More specifically, the conflict within liberal democracy is between the pursuit of individual or coporate interest, on the one hand, and a "people" increasingly fractured by economic and cultural clashes, on the other. Dallmayr asks whether there is still room for genuine privacy and authentic democracy when all public goods, from schools to parks, police, and armies, have been made the target of privatization. In this book, Dallmayr sets out to rescue democracy as a shared public and post-liberal regime. Nonetheless, "post-liberalism" does not involve the denial of human freedom nor does it suggest the endorsement of illiberal collectivism or nationalism. Drawing on a wide range of contemporary political, religious, and secular thought, Dallmayr charts a possible path to a liberal socialism that is devoid of egalitarian imperatives and a private sphere free from acquisitiveness.
 

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Contents

Liberalism and Democracy
1
Narcissism and Public Agency
24
Public Space as Property? Thinking at the Edge of the Cave
40
Aristotle and His Heirs
45
Is there a Natural Rightness?
67
A Concrete Utopia
81
The Politics of Virtue? A PostLiberal Agenda
100
Reflections on Glocalism
109
World History and Redemption
129
Schelling and Heidegger on Freedom
145
Maintaining the WorldUnder Heaven
168
Learning to be Human
185
Notes
195
Index
215
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About the author (2019)

Fred Dallmayr is the Packey J. Dee Professor of Philosophy and Political Science at Notre Dame University. He is the author of thirty books, including Democracy to Come.

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