First Lessons in Learning French

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George R. Lockwood, 1858 - French language - 194 pages
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Page 189 - La Fontaine's beautiful Fables are known to every French scholar, and are admirably adapted to be used as a book for translation. Each fable is followed by its appropriate moral ; and thus just principles, in a pleasing manner, are inculcated into the mind of the reader while engaged in his study.
Page 102 - Que j'aie. Que j'aie eu. Que tu aies. Que tu aies eu. Qu'il ait. Qu'il ait eu. Que nous ayons. Que nous ayons eu. Que vous ayez. Que vous ayez eu. Qu'ils aient.
Page 130 - J'aime la philosophie qui enseigne à se contenter de peu. Est-il donc vrai, repartit le jeune mouton, que vous ne mangez point la chair des animaux et qu'un peu d'herbe vous suffit ? Si cela est, vivons comme frères et paissons ensemble.
Page 189 - Mabire. 16 mo. 45 cts. Most of the Guides to French Conversation heretofore published in this country have been merely collections of certain conversations on specified subjects, which, unless they were again to recur in the precise form of the lesson, would be of but little assistance to the student. In other words, he but stores his mind with set...
Page 188 - The editor has carefully revised the text, and has faithfully followed the most approved Paris editions. As to the Comedies selected, though many others of the same writer are at least equal, if not superior, in merit, it must be remembered that this is a Molière intended for schools and for the use of young persons, and the selection has been made in reference to that object.
Page 187 - Though a work of fiction, the incidents are partly founded on fact ; the historical scenes and characters are correctly drawn, and present a fair view of this most eventful period of French history. "Containing none but just and moral sentiments, it is admirably adapted to be used as a School Reader, and we trust that it will meet with the favor it deserves.
Page 189 - ... but little assistance to the student. In other words, he but stores his mind with set formal phrases for specific occasions, without an acquaintance with the genius and power of the language, or the ability to adapt his knowledge to the peculiar and varied circumstances of every-day life.
Page 187 - But the wreath of Goldsmith is unsullied; he wrote to exalt virtue and expose vice; and he accomplished his task in a manner which raises him to the highest rank among British authors.
Page 102 - Qu'il ou qu'elle ait eu. Que nous ayons. Que nous ayons eu. Que vous ayez. Que vous ayez eu. Qu'ils ou qu'elles aient.
Page 101 - J'aurais. J'aurais eu. Tu aurais. Tu aurais eu. Il aurait. Il aurait eu. Nous aurions. Nous aurions eu. Vous auriez. Vous auriez eu. Ils auraient. Ils auraient eu.

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