The Lives of the Most Eminent British Painters, Sculptors, and Architects, Volume 1

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J. Murray, 1830 - Architects
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Page 251 - Still born to improve us in every part — His pencil our faces, his manners our heart ; To coxcombs averse, yet most civilly steering, When they judged without skill, he was still hard of hearing; When they talked of their Raphaels, Correggios, and stuff, He shifted his trumpet,* and only took snuff.
Page 270 - Here Reynolds is laid, and to tell you my mind, He has not left a wiser or better behind : His pencil was striking, resistless, and grand : His manners were gentle, complying, and bland ; Still born to improve us in every part, His pencil our faces, his manners our heart...
Page 75 - And it came to pass, as soon as he came nigh unto the camp, that he saw the calf, and the dancing : and Moses' anger waxed hot, and he cast the tables out of his hands, and brake them beneath the mount.
Page 269 - The only dedication I ever made was to my brother, because I loved him better than most other men. He is since dead. Permit me to inscribe this Poem to you.
Page 178 - Farewell, great painter of mankind ! Who reach'd the noblest point of art, Whose pictured morals charm the mind, And through the eye correct the heart. If Genius fire thee, reader, stay, If nature touch thee, drop a tear, If neither move thee — turn away — For Hogarth's honour'd dust lies here.
Page 98 - He who should call the ingenious Hogarth a burlesque painter, would, in my opinion, do him very little honour ; for sure it is much easier, much less the subject of admiration, to paint a man with a nose, or any other feature, of a preposterous size, or to expose him in some absurd or monstrous attitude, than to express the affections of men on canvas.
Page 54 - Thou, I hear, a pleasant rogue art. Were but you and I acquainted, Every Monster should be painted : You should try your graving tools On this odious group of Fools; Draw the beasts as I describe them...
Page 112 - ... from Ford; but he was not to tell what, or to whom. He walked out; he was followed; but somewhere about St. Paul's they lost him. He came back, and said he had delivered the message, and the women exclaimed, 'Then we are all undone!
Page 18 - Thereto longeth heaven, made of timber and stained cloth. Item. Hell, made of timber, and iron-work, with devils in number thirteen. Item. Four knights, armed, keeping the sepulchre, with their weapons in their hands, that is to say, two axes and two spears. Item. Three pair of angels' wings ; four angels, made of timber, and well painted.
Page 327 - His talents of every kind, powerful from nature, and not meanly cultivated by letters, his social virtues in all the relations and all the habitudes of life, rendered him the centre of a very great and unparalleled variety of agreeable societies, which will be dissipated by his death. He had too much merit not to excite some jealousy, too much innocence to provoke any enmity. The loss of no man of his time can be felt with more sincere, general, and unmixed sorrow.

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