Science of Percussion Instruments

Front Cover
World Scientific, 2000 - Music - 208 pages
1 Review
Percussion instruments may be our oldest musical instruments, but only recently have they become the subject of extensive scientific study. This book focuses on how percussion instruments vibrate and produce sound and how these sounds are perceived by listeners.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

The Percussion Family
1
Sound and Hearing
21
Vibrations of Bars and Air Columns
47
Metallophones
64
Vibrations of Plates and Shells
79
Cymbals Gongs and Plates
89
Caribbean Steelpans
107
Church Bells and Carillon Bells
128
Handbells Choirchimes Crotals and Cow Bells
146
Eastern Bells
164
Glass Musical Instruments
182
Other Percussion Instruments
192
Name Index
203
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

References to this book

Statistics in Musicology
Jan Beran
No preview available - 2003
All Book Search results »

About the author (2000)

Thomas D. Rossing completed his B.A. at Luther College in 1950, his M.S. and Ph.D. at Iowa State University in 1954. His dissertation was in the field of molecular physics. After graduating, he went into industrial research, and from there, he went to teaching. Currently, he is a professor at Northern Illinois University.

Professor Rossing has published more than 200 papers and ten books. He is a Fellow of the Acoustical Society of America and of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. He has held about a dozen research positions other than at his home institution--in national laboratories, in research universities, and in several other countries. The Acoustical Society of America awarded him the Silver Medal in Musical Acoustics.

Bibliographic information