Obsessive Genius: The Inner World of Marie Curie

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W. W. Norton & Company, 2005 - Biography & Autobiography - 256 pages
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Curie (1867-1934) is still regarded by most as the pre-eminent woman scientist of the 20th century. This biography illuminates both the public Curie, a tireless scientist, and the private one, a woman who suffered bouts of severe depression, was distant from her children and scarred deeply by the accidental death of her scientist husband, Pierre, in 1906. Using long-sealed Curie family archives, Goldsmith offers a well-rounded view of Curie. Goldsmith also reminds us that Curie overcame obstacles, including pervasive sexism within the scientific community that almost cost her the Nobel Prize.
 

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Obsessive genius: the inner world of Marie Curie

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Marie Curie's ability to focus her intelligence on what she wanted to accomplish is legendary, and in this exploration of Curie's "obsessive genius" Goldsmith (Little Gloria...Happy at Last ) has ... Read full review

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Very Good. Put in a lot more information than other biographies on the life of Marie Curie

Contents

Introduction
13
Early Influences
20
I Came Through It All Honestly
33
Paris
45
Pierre
53
CHAPTERS Remarkable Accidents
61
The Question Was Entirely New
68
The Best Sprinters
80
My Children Cannot Awaken Life in Me
145
The Chemistry of the Invisible
154
Honor and Dishonor
165
She Is Very Obstinate
177
All My Strength
183
The Making of a Myth
191
To Pass the Torch
205
Maries Legacy
220

CHAPTERS A Beautiful Color
89
What Is the Source of the Energy?
101
I Will Make Him an Help Meet for Him
107
The Disaster of Our Lives
114
We Were Happy
127
The Metamorphosis
135
Acknowledgments
234
Notes
237
Selected Bibliography
249
Photo Credits
256
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About the author (2005)

Barbara Goldsmith was born Barbara Joan Lubin on May 18, 1931 in Manhattan, New York. She received a bachelor's degree in English and art history from Wellesley College in 1953. After college, she worked for Art News as a critic before becoming an editor at Woman's Home Companion, where she created an entertainment section. Later, she worked at Town and Country, where she started a series called The Creative Environment, for which she interviewed important figures in the arts. She wrote for The New York Herald Tribune and then became one of the founding editors of New York magazine. She was a senior editor at Harper's Bazaar in the early 1970s, but soon left to write the novel The Straw Man. Her account of the 1934 custody battle over Gloria Vanderbilt entitled Little Gloria Happy at Last was published in 1980 and was turned into an NBC mini-series in 1982. Her other non-fiction works included Johnson v. Johnson; Other Powers: The Age of Suffrage, Spiritualism and the Scandalous Victoria Woodhull; and Obsessive Genius: The Inner World of Marie Curie. She died from heart failure on June 26, 2016 at the age of 85.

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