The Rebellion Record: A Diary of American Events, with Documents, Narratives, Illustrative Incidents, Poetry, Etc, Volume 2

Front Cover
Frank Moore
G. P. Putnam, 1862 - United States
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Vols. 1-8 each in three divisions, separately paged: I. Diary of events; II. Documents and narratives; III. Poetry, rumors and incidents. Vol. 9 in two divisions, omitting "Diary of events"; v. 10-11 and supplement. "Documents" only.
 

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Contents

N T Tribune Narrative of the Battle of Bull 32
76
Gen McClellans Proclamation to the Soldiers of the Army of the West June 23 167
84
Gov Letchers Proclamations to the People
85
Northwestern Virginia June 14
107
Senator Douglas Last Letter 128
111
vention in Wheeling
154
Fight at Carters Creek Va
169
New York3lBt Regiment S V
170
Col P St George Cooket Response
171
New York 2Sth Regiment S V
172
Col Wallaces Official Report of the Skirmish at Pattersons Creek
174
Ires Kings Address to the Graduating Class of Columbia College N Y June 2C 1861
175
General Banks Proclamation Juno 27
176
32d Regiment S V
177
Gen Hanks Instructions June 7
178
Plan of the Battle at Great Bethel
179
Official Report of the Action at Matthias Point
180
Rebel Official Account of the Battle at New Creek Va
184
Reverdy Johnson on the Power of the Presi dent to suspend the Habeas Corpus writ
185
Lieut Mayos Response to the Proclamation of Got Letcher
193
DelawareMeeting at Dover June 27
194
60 Gen Schencks Defence 195
195
Gen Banks Proclamation July 1
196
Charles D Drakes Speech at Louisiana Mo
197
Joseph Sugars Speech in the Virginia House of Delegates March 30
214
Galusha A Grows Speech July 4
222
Abraham Lincolns Message July 4
223
Report of the Secretary of War July 1
229
the Navy July 4
235
68A Tte Fight at Romney Va
242
Carthage Mo July 5
246
70j Skirmish at Newport News Va July 5
251
Fourth of JulyRecurring to First Principles
252
A Flag of Truce from the Rebels
254
The Capture of the French Lady
255
Debate on the Loan Bill in the House of Repre sentatives July 10
256
Daniel S Dickinson Address at Amherst Col lege
259
76j Battle at Monroe Station Mo
270
Col SiegeVs Report of the Battle of Carthage
271
Henry A Wises Proclamation July 6
273
Recerdy Johnson Remarks in the Supremo Court of the United States
274
Major Sturgis Proclamation July 4
275
McClellans Report
283
Statement of David L Hart
284
Fight at Barboursville Va 235
285
Col Pegrams Surrender July 12 2SS 88 Battle of Carricks Ford Va 2S6 89 Confederate Army Generals
296
Report of Colonel Davies July 14
303
Gen Ilurlburls Proclamation July 15
304
Leonidas Polks General Order July IS
310
Peace Meeting at Nyack N Y July 15
311
The Advance into Virginia
312
N Y Herald
314
N Y Times
319
971 The Constitution of the Confederate States of America
321
Occupation of Fairfax Court House Va 827
327
H J Raymonds Account 827
329
Secession Narratives
350
TFar Department Order in reference to Enlist ing Foreigners
353
General McClellans Address to his Soldiers July 19
354
United States Senate July 25
403
State from holding office under the United
440
Potters Report on the Loyalty of Government
446
General D M Frosts Letter to Claiborne
494
Resolutions of the Convention of Western Vir
522
187
531
Bishop Odenheimeis Pastoral Letter Aug 19537
537
POETRY Pagb
1
A Battle Hymn James Mackey 11
11
derwood 34
34
To Jefferson Davis 44
44
Let Us Alone W H Burleigh 47
47
The Soldiers Last Word Park Benjamin 48
48
The StarSpangled Banner London Punch 49
49
Hear us Father Save our Land E T P Beach 60
50
To the United States ilaync Reid 51
51
The Men who Fell in Baltimore J W Forney 52
52
The Dream and the Awakening 53
53
A Song for the Illinois Volunteers Agnes 54
54
Russells Flight by B 65
60
Kentucky Forsylhe Willson 61
61
The Invisible Armies 62
62
The War Slogan dedicated to Captain McMul lins Rangers 03
63
The Recaptured Flag by W 8 V 63
64
Upon the Hill before Centreville Geo LT Boker 65
65
Wars Changes B P Shillaber 67
67
Our Southern Land 63
68
Jeff Davis is Coming O 0 70
70
7S The Flag Divided 71
71
Song sung in Richmond 73
73
0 Lettuce Alone 74
74
A Vision in the Forum T Buchanan Bead 76
76
A Gathering Song 77
77
A Psalm of Freedom Bev E II Sears 78
78
The Reason Why E F 79
79
Ho Sons of the Puritan 80
80
Compromise Edna Dean Proctor 81
81
War Sonnet C E Tuckerman 83
83
Freedoms Banner Louisville Journal 88
88
The Union E L Manter 89
89
Yankee Doodle on the Crisis 93
93
Southward Ho 94
94
The Cavaliers Song Vanity Fair 95
95
What of the Night? 96
96
Weep oer the Heroes as they Fall Chat Wm Butler 97
97
Catholic Cathedral T ffulbert Underwood 9T 110 The London Times on American Affairs 104
104
Manassas Florence Willesford Borron 105
105
The Battle Summer H T Tuckerman 106
106
My Maryland words altered J F Wie sltampel Jr 107
107
Nineteen Hundred 108
108
To General Butler by Bay State 109
109
God Preserve the Union John Savage 110
110
Oh Say not it is borne to Earth Ed G Jones Ul 124 The Two Furrows C II Webb 112
112

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Page 226 - This is essentially a people's contest. On the side of the Union it is a struggle for maintaining in the world that form and substance of Government whose leading object is to elevate the condition of men ; to lift artificial weights from all shoulders ; to clear the paths of laudable pursuit for all; to afford all an unfettered start and a fair chance in the race of life.
Page 321 - States, reserving to the States respectively the appointment of the officers and the authority of training the militia according to the discipline prescribed by Congress; 17. To exercise exclusive legislation in all cases whatsoever over such district (not exceeding ten miles square) as may, by cession of particular States and the acceptance of Congress, become the seat of the Government of the United States...
Page 321 - To declare war, grant letters of marque and reprisal, and make rules concerning captures on land and water; 12 To raise and support armies, but no appropriation of money to that use shall be for a longer term than two years ; 13 To provide and maintain a navy...
Page 319 - When vacancies happen in the representation from any state, the executive authority thereof shall issue writs of election to fill such vacancies.
Page 165 - ... whenever any form of government becomes destructive of these ends, it is the right of the people to alter or abolish it, and to institute a new government, laying its foundations on such principles, and organizing its powers in such form, as to them shall seem most likely to effect their safety and happiness.
Page 320 - Each House shall keep a Journal of its Proceedings, and from time to time publish the same, excepting such Parts as may in their Judgment require Secrecy ; and the Yeas and Nays of the Members of either House on any question shall, at the Desire of one fifth of those Present, be entered on the Journal.
Page 138 - The assent of the states, in their sovereign capacity, is implied in calling a convention, and thus submitting that instrument to the people. But the people were at perfect liberty to accept or reject it; and their act was final. It required not the affirmance, and could not be negatived, by the state governments. The constitution, when thus adopted, was of complete obligation, and bound the state sovereignties.
Page 209 - That the maintenance inviolate of the rights of the States, and especially the right of each State to order and control its own domestic institutions according to its own judgment exclusively, is essential to that balance of power on which the perfection and endurance of our political fabric depend; and we denounce the lawless invasion by armed force of the soil of any State or Territory, no matter under what pretext, as among the gravest of crimes.
Page 165 - State; that standing armies, in time of peace, should be avoided as dangerous to liberty ; and that in all cases the military should be under strict subordination to, and governed by, the civil power.
Page lii - That maritime law, in time of war, has long been the subject of deplorable disputes; That the uncertainty of the law and of the duties in such a matter, gives rise to differences of opinion between neutrals and belligerents which may occasion serious difficulties, and even conflicts...

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