Peter Simple

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Fireship Press, 2009 - Fiction - 448 pages
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From the Father of Modern Nautical Fiction While Frederick Marryat had achieved commercial success with his previous books, Peter Simple was perhaps his first "classic." Indeed, Peter Simple is considered by many to be the best of Captain Marryat's novels. Peter Simple goes to sea as a young, naive, midshipman during the Napoleonic wars. He is taken under the wing of Terence O'Brien, a Master's Mate, who, a bit at a time, brings Peter into a mature adulthood. Together they form a kind of nautical Don Quixote/Sancho Panza team that experiences the best and the worst that the nautical life has to offer. From cutting-out missions, to hurricanes, to mutiny, Peter Simple set the standard for presenting vivid characters and heart stopping adventure to the nautical reader. "[Marryat's] stories depict, with detailed realism, those qualities of courage, seamanship, tyranny, cruelty, recklessness, and good fellowship, all of which combined to render the British Navy so formidable a fighting instrument." J.A. Buckley The Guide to British Historical Fiction
 

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About the author (2009)

Frederick Marryat was born on July 10, 1792 in London, England. He entered the Royal Navy at the age of 14 and served with distinction in many parts of the world before retiring in 1830 with the rank of captain. From 1832 to 1835, he edited the Metropolitan Magazine. His first novel, The Naval Officer, was published in 1829. His other adult novels include Mr. Midshipman Easy, The Kings Own, Newton Forster, Peter Simple, Jacob Faithful, and The Phantom Ship. He also wrote a number of children's books including Masterman Ready, Settlers in Canada, The Mission, The Children of the New Forest, and The Little Savages. He travelled in Canada and the United States from 1837 to 1839. Afterward, he recorded his impressions in A Diary in America. He died on August 9, 1848.

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