The Potato: How the Humble Spud Rescued the Western World

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Macmillan, Oct 25, 1999 - Cooking - 319 pages
4 Reviews

The Potato tells the story of how a humble vegetable, once regarded as trash food, had as revolutionary an impact on Western history as the railroad or the automobile. Using Ireland, England, France, and the United States as examples, Larry Zuckerman shows how daily life from the 1770s until World War I would have been unrecognizable-perhaps impossible-without the potato, which functioned as fast food, famine insurance, fuel and labor saver, budget stretcher, and bank loan, as well as delicacy. Drawing on personal diaries, contemporaneous newspaper accounts, and other primary sources, this is popular social history at its liveliest and most illuminating.

 

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - Hanno - LibraryThing

Meh. The potato part of the book is pretty boring. The only part I found interesting is the descriptions of living conditions in Ireland, England and France during the described era. Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - ratastrophe - LibraryThing

Zuckerman manages to make potatoes (as well as land politics in Europe) an interesting, engaging topic. Read full review

Contents

2
17
3
35
4
57
5
85
A Fortress Besieged
129
A Passion for Thrift
161
9
173
The Lumpers They Were Black
187
10
220
11
229
12
252
13
265
Notes
273
Selected Bibliography
303
Index
315
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About the author (1999)

Larry Zuckerman is a freelance editor and writer. He lives in Seattle with his wife and young son.

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