The Franklin Expedition from First to Last

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J. Churchill, 1855 - Northwest Passage - 224 pages
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Page 102 - From the mutilated state of many of the corpses, and the contents of the kettles, it is evident that our wretched countrymen had been driven to the last resource, cannibalism, as a means of prolonging existence.
Page 101 - Doot-ko-hi-calik), as its description, and that of the low shore in the neighbourhood of Point Ogle and Montreal Island, agree exactly with that of Sir George Back.* Some of the bodies...
Page 100 - Land, which is a large island. None of the party could speak the Esquimaux language intelligibly; but by signs the natives were made to understand that their ship, or ships, had been crushed by ice, and that they were now going to where they expected to find deer to shoot. From the appearance of the men, all of whom except one officer looked thin, they were then supposed to be getting short of provisions ; and they purchased a small seal from the natives. At a later date...
Page 100 - In the spring, four winters past (spring, 1850), a party of ' white men,' amounting to about 40, were seen travelling southward over the ice and dragging a boat with them by some Esquimaux, who were killing seals near the north shore of King William's Land, which is a large island. None of the party could speak the Esquimaux language intelligibly, but by signs the natives were made to understand that their ship, or ships, had been crushed by ice, and that they were now going to where they expected...
Page 103 - ... heap on the ground by the natives out of the kegs or cases containing it ; and a quantity of ball and shot was found below high-water mark, having probably been left on the ice close to the beach. There must have been a number of watches, compasses, telescopes, guns (several double-barrelled), &c.
Page 99 - White men' (Kabloonans) had perished from want of food some distance to the westward, and not far beyond a large river containing many falls and rapids. Subsequently, further particulars were received, and a number of articles purchased, which places the fate of a portion, if not of all, of the then survivon of Sir John Franklin's long-lost party beyond a doubt — a fate as terrible as the imagination can conceive.
Page 61 - Land is praiseworthy in attempt, but forlorn in hope. In the former effort, it is assumed that Sir John Franklin has made the passage, and that his arrest is between the Mackenzie River and Icy Cape ; in the latter, that Sir James Ross will reach Banks' Land, and trace its continuity to Victoria and Wollaston Land, and thus make the
Page 60 - ... feel, but the whole civilized world. When this regret is felt, and every soul has perished, such a mission as I have proposed will be urged again and again for adoption ; for it is impossible that the country will rest satisfied until a search be made for the remains of the lost expedition by a person in whom the country has confidence.
Page 59 - ... success, that it is merely necessary, to put this assistance aside as far from certain, to mention that Sir John Ross found Barrow's Strait closed in the summer of 1832. To a land journey, then, alone we can look for success ; for the failure of a land journey would be the exception to the rule, while the sea expedition would be the rule itself. To the western land of North Somerset, where Sir John Franklin is likely to be found, the Great Fish River is the direct and only route ; and although...
Page 193 - And whereas the said undertakers for their further encouragement in the said design have humbly besought us to incorporate them...

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