Handbook of Computational Economics, Volume 1

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H.M. Amman, D.A. Kendrick, J. Rust, Leigh Tesfatsion, Karl Schmedders, Kenneth L. Judd, Carsien Harm Hommes, Blake Dean LeBaron
Elsevier Science, Jun 27, 1996 - Business & Economics - 827 pages
The aim of this volume is to provide an introduction and selective overview of the rapidly emerging field of computational economics. Computational economics provides an important set of tools that an increasing number of economists will need to acquire in order to understand and do state-of-the-art research in virtually all areas of economics. Articles in the volume range from very applied, policy oriented applications of computational methods, to highly theoretical and mathematically complex analyses of algorithms and numerical methods. The book emphasizes the unique contributions of computational methods in economics, and focuses on problems for which well developed solutions are not already available from the literature in operations research, numerical methods, and computer science. As well as covering relatively mature areas in the field, a number of chapters are included which cover more speculative "frontier topics", in particular recently discovered computational innovations and research results. For more information on the Handbooks in Economics series, please see our homepage on http://www.elsevier.nl/locate/hes

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Contents

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41
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About the author (1996)

Kenneth Joseph Arrow was born in New York City on August 23, 1921. He received a bachelor's degree in social science and in mathematics from City College. He did his graduate work at Columbia University. He served in the Army Air Corps during World War II. He taught at Harvard University from 1968 to 1979 and at Stanford University until retiring in 1991. He was an economist who was known for his contributions to mathematical economics. He wrote numerous books including Social Choice and Individual Values and Social Choice and Multicriterion Decision-Making written with Herve Raynaud. Arrow and John R. Hicks received the 1972 Nobel Memorial Prize in Economic Science for their work in welfare economics and the theory of social choice. In 2004, Arrow received the National Medal of Science, the nation's highest scientific honor. He died on February 21, 2017 at the age of 95.

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