The Rise of Civilization in East Asia: The Archaeology of China, Korea and Japan

Front Cover
Thames and Hudson, 1999 - History - 288 pages
Here is the first synthesis ever published of East Asian archaeology and early history. Drawing on dramatic new evidence made available since the 1970s, it charts the critical developments that culminated in the emergence of the region in the eighth century as a coherent entity, with a shared religion (Buddhism), state philosophy (Confucianism), and bureaucratic structure. The narrative begins over a million years ago, when early humans first colonized the Far East, and it continues through the growth of fishing and farming societies at the end of the Ice Age to the rise of social elites during the Bronze Age, and the emergence of civilization in Shang, Zhou, and Han China. The author follows the spread of rice-based agriculture, trade, and interactions between the different cultures, and the diffusion of common forms of city planning and administration. Copious photographs and drawings complement the text.

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About the author (1999)

Barnes is NSK Professor of Japanese Studies and Director of the Centre for Research in East Asian Archaeology at the University of Durham. She taught the archaeology of Est Asia for 15 year at Cambridge University.

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