The Percy Family: The Baltic to Vesuvius

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A.F. Graves, 1868 - Europe - 256 pages
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Page 203 - ... which extended itself at the top into a sort of branches ; occasioned, I imagine, either by a sudden gust of air that impelled it, the force of which decreased as it advanced upwards, or the cloud itself being pressed back again by its own weight, expanded in this manner : it appeared sometimes bright and sometimes dark and spotted, as it was more or less impregnated with earth and cinders.
Page 201 - It appeared sometimes bright, and sometimes dark and spotted, as it was either more or less impregnated with earth and cinders. This extraordinary phenomenon excited my uncle's philosophical curiosity to take a nearer view of it. He ordered a light vessel to be got ready, and gave me the liberty, if I thought proper, to attend him. I rather chose to continue my studies ; for, as it happened, he had given me an employment of that kind. As he was...
Page 144 - While stands the Coliseum, Rome shall stand; 'When falls the Coliseum, Rome shall fall; 'And when Rome falls — the World.
Page 202 - ... and black pieces of burning rock. They were likewise in danger not only of being aground by the sudden retreat of the sea, but also from the vast fragments which rolled down from the mountain and obstructed all the shore. Here he stopped to consider whether he should return back again ; to which the pilot advising him, "Fortune," said he, "befriends the brave.
Page 201 - Hastening then to the place from whence others fled with the utmost terror, he steered his course direct to the point of danger, and with so much calmness and presence of mind as to be able to make and dictate his observations upon the motion and all the phenomena of that dreadful scene.
Page 122 - A school-boy on his bench, at early dawn Glowing with Roman story, I should live To tread the Appian, once an avenue Of monuments most glorious, palaces, — Their doors sealed up and silent as the night, The dwellings of the illustrious dead : to turn Toward Tiber, and, beyond the city gate, Pour out my unpremeditated verse, Where on his mule I might have met so oft Horace himself : or climb the Palatine...
Page 203 - ... at the top into a sort of branches; occasioned, I imagine, either by a sudden gust of air that impelled it, the force of which decreased as it advanced upwards ; or the cloud itself being pressed back again by its own weight, expanded in this manner. It appeared sometimes bright, and sometimes dark and spotted, as it was either more or less impregnated with earth and cinders.
Page 247 - I desired to serve, but for the interests of France. I felt great reluctance to put reins upon the ardour of our soldiers, to retrench from my programme the territory from the Mincio to the Adriatic, and to see vanish from honest hearts noble illusions and patriotic hopes. In order to serve the independence of Italy, I made war against the mind of Europe, and as soon as the destinies of my country appeared to be endangered, I concluded peace.
Page 246 - ... begin a long and barren war, I found myself in face of Europe in arms, ready either to dispute our successes or to aggravate our reverses. Nevertheless, the difficulty of the enterprise would not have shaken my resolution, if the means had not been out of proportion to the results to be expected. It was necessary to crush boldly the obstacles opposed by neutral territories, and then to accept a conflict on the Rhine as well as on the Adige.
Page 140 - ... some of the churches, we were shown pictures painted by Luke, and others of the apostles ; and from one end of the city to the other some relic is preserved to draw attention, and, what is of more importance, money - — the cradle in which the Savior was rocked by nis virgin mother ; a remarkable stone, on which are the impressions of two human feet, said to be those of Christ, the stone being one on which he stood when he met Peter once in Rome, and said to him, " Thou art Peter, and on this...

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