ROUGHING IT

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Contents

I
1
II
4
III
10
IV
19
V
31
VI
37
VII
43
VIII
52
XXII
155
XXIII
161
XXIV
168
XXV
175
XXVI
183
XXVII
189
XXVIII
194
XXIX
201

IX
57
X
63
XI
73
XII
81
XIII
93
XIV
98
XV
102
XVI
110
XVII
120
XVIII
126
XIX
131
XX
136
XXI
144
XXX
207
XXXI
213
XXXII
224
XXXIII
230
XXXIV
234
XXXV
241
XXXVI
245
XXXVII
252
XXXVIII
259
XXXIX
264
XL
271
XLI
280

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Page 112 - Jared, who came from the tower of which hath been spoken ; and we also know that they have been translated by the gift and power of God, for his voice hath declared it unto us ; wherefore we know of a surety that the work is true.
Page 53 - ... happened. He rode a splendid horse that was born for a racer and fed and lodged like a gentleman; kept him at his utmost speed for ten miles, and then, as he came crashing up to the station where stood two men holding fast a fresh, impatient steed, the transfer of rider and mail-bag was made in the twinkling of an eye, and away flew the eager pair and were out of sight before the spectator could get hardly the ghost of a look. Both rider and horse went "flying light.
Page 32 - The cayote is a long, slim, sick and sorrylooking skeleton, with a gray wolf-skin stretched over it, a tolerably bushy tail that forever sags down with a despairing expression of forsakenness and misery, a furtive and evil eye, and a long, sharp face, with slightly lifted lip and exposed teeth.
Page 112 - ... commandments of God, we bear testimony of these things. And we know that if we are faithful in Christ, we shall rid our garments of the blood of all men, and be found spotless before the judgment-seat of Christ, and shall dwell with him eternally in the heavens.
Page 111 - BE IT KNOWN unto all nations, kindreds, tongues, and people, unto whom this work shall come: That Joseph Smith, Jun., the translator of this work, has shown unto us the plates of which hath been spoken, which have the appearance of gold; and as many of the leaves as the said Smith has translated we did handle with our hands; and we also saw the engravings thereon, all of which has the appearance...
Page 156 - We plodded on, two or three hours longer, and at last the lake burst upon us— a noble sheet of blue water lifted six thousand three hundred feet above the level of the sea, and walled in by a rim of snow-clad mountain peaks that towered aloft full three thousand feet higher still! It was a vast oval, and one would have to use up eighty or a hundred good miles in traveling around it.
Page 145 - ... close together, side by side, as if room were scarce in that mighty plain. The sidewalk was of boards that were more or less loose and inclined to rattle when walked upon. In the middle of the town, opposite the stores, was the "plaza...
Page 54 - ... nearer and still nearer, and the flutter of the hoofs comes faintly to the ear— another instant a whoop and a hurrah from our upper deck, a wave of the rider's hand, but no reply, and man and horse burst past our excited faces, and go winging away like a belated fragment of a storm!
Page 70 - Here, right by my side, was the actual ogre who, in fights and brawls and various ways, had taken the lives of twenty-six human beings, or all men lied about him ! I suppose I was the proudest stripling that ever traveled to see strange lands and wonderful people.
Page 31 - ... an outlook over the world-wide carpet about us for things new and strange to gaze at. Even at this day it thrills me through and through to think of the life, the gladness and the wild sense of freedom that used to make the blood dance in my veins on those fine overland mornings ! Along about an hour after breakfast we saw the first prairiedog villages, the first antelope, and the first wolf. If I remember rightly, this latter was the regular coyote (pronounced ky-o-te) of the farther deserts....

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