A Raisin in the Sun

Front Cover
Vintage Books, 1958 - Drama - 151 pages
154 Reviews
When it was first produced in 1959, A Raisin in the Sun was awarded the New York Drama Critics Circle Award and hailed as a watershed in American drama. Not only was it a pioneering work by an African-American playwright - Lorraine Hansberry's play was also a radically new representation of black life, one that was resolutely authentic, fiercely unsentimental, and unflinching in its vision of what happens to people whose dreams are constantly deferred. In her portrait of an embattled Chicago family, Hansberry anticipated issues that range from generational clashes to the civil rights and women's movements. She also posed the essential questions - about identity, justice and moral responsibility - at the heart of these great struggles. The result is a work that captivated audiences from every walk of life and has become a classic of American letters.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

User ratings

5 stars
57
4 stars
68
3 stars
22
2 stars
5
1 star
2

Review: A Raisin in the Sun

User Review  - Goodreads

Read for school, not that good. I'm dissecting this book in English class so I'm probably gonna be forced to spend a long time with It. I mean it wasn't that bad. It was actually pretty good. But I didn't feel amazed. With no really good climax and plot, this book gets 4.5/10 stars Read full review

Review: A Raisin in the Sun

User Review  - I guess you can call me Maria (Marmalade4evs) - Goodreads

Read for school, not that good. I'm dissecting this book in English class so I'm probably gonna be forced to spend a long time with It. I mean it wasn't that bad. It was actually pretty good. But I didn't feel amazed. With no really good climax and plot, this book gets 4.5/10 stars Read full review

All 12 reviews »

Selected pages

Contents

Section 1
4
Section 2
5
Section 3
15
Section 4
20
Section 5
22
Section 6
76
Section 7
131
Section 8
152
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

About the author (1958)

American playwright Lorraine Hansberry was born on May 19, 1930 in Chicago. After attending the University of Wisconsin for two years and then studying painting in Chicago and Mexico, Hansberry moved to New York in 1950. There she held a number of odd jobs to make ends meet while trying to establish her writing career. Hansberry wrote her first play A Raisin in the Sun in 1959. The first drama by a black woman to be produced on Broadway. A Raisin in the Sun tells the story of a working-class black family in Chicago. The production won the New York Drama Critics' Circle Award, and in 1961, the film version, starring Sidney Poitier and Ruby Dee, received a special award at the Cannes Film Festival. Hansberry's next play, The Sign in Sidney Brustein's Window, a drama set in Greenwich Village, had a short run on Broadway in 1964. Hansberry's promising career was tragically cut short by her premature death on January 12, 1965. She was 34 years old. The plays To Be Young, Gifted and Black and Les Blancs were adapted from Hansberry's early writings by her ex-husband Robert Nemiroff. Both plays were produced off-Broadway, in 1969 and 1970 respectively.

Bibliographic information