Your Teacher Said What?!: Trying to Raise a Fifth Grade Capitalist in Obama's America

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Penguin, May 12, 2011 - Business & Economics - 256 pages
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Every morning on CNBC’s Squawk Box, Joe Kernen asks challenging questions. And at home he does the same with his young daughter, Blake. What are you learning in school? What TV shows do you like? What message did you get from that movie? Your teacher said what?!

 When Blake was nine, her answers told Joe that she had already absorbed a distorted view of economics—from her school, pop culture, and just about everywhere else. She was learning that capitalism is unavoidably immoral . . . that business people can’t be trusted, especially if they run big companies . . . that trade is bad because it hurts American workers . . . and that no matter how bad things get, the government will always bail us out.

Joe was outraged. If he couldn’t fix our education system or Hollywood, at least he could teach Blake how capitalism really works, and why it’s worth defending. Ultimately, Joe convinced Blake that capitalism isn’t about greed; it’s about freedom. In today’s America, there’s no greater lesson to teach your children.


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User Review  - LadyJai - LibraryThing

As a parent with a child in the public school system, I found this a book a wonderful read. I've pretty much got a handle on the topics here but Joe Kernen breaks it down in a very easy to understand ... Read full review


Title Page
The ABCs of the Free Market
The Properties of Property
Who Made My Shoelaces?
America vs Europe
99 985 Percent Pure The Price of Regulation
The 40 Ostrich
Lies Ded Lies and the Opinion Pages

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About the author (2011)

Joe Kernen is the coanchor of CNBC’s longest-running program, the top-rated morning show Squawk Box. Before going into television he had a successful ten-year career as a stockbroker, and before that he earned a master’s degree in molecular biology from MIT and worked at one of the world’s leading cancer research centers. Blake Kernen is a sixth grade student. They live in New Jersey with Blake’s mom, Penelope, and her little brother, Scott.

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