Moral Philosophy: Ethics Deontology and Natural Law

Front Cover
Longmans, Green, and Company, 1919 - Ethics - 379 pages
1 Review
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

I
xvii
II
ii
III
27
IV
41
V
64
VI
109
VII
126
VIII
133
X
177
XI
191
XIII
202
XIV
224
XV
237
XVI
244
XVII
263
XVIII
278

IX
159
XIX
297

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 298 - To this war of every man, against every man, this also is consequent; that nothing can be unjust. The notions of right and wrong, justice and injustice, have there no place. Where there is no common power, there is no law: where no law, no injustice.
Page 298 - Hereby it is manifest that during the time men live without a common power to keep them all in awe, they are in that condition which is called war; and such a war, as is of every man against every man.
Page 299 - They are qualities that relate to men in society, not in solitude. It is consequent also to the same condition that there be no propriety, no dominion, no ' mine ' and ' thine ' distinct, but only that to be every man's that he can get, and for so long as he can keep it.
Page 298 - Again, men have no pleasure (but on the contrary a great deal of grief) in keeping company where there is no power able to overawe them all.
Page 185 - ... the motive has nothing to do with the morality of the action, though much with the worth of the agent.
Page 302 - ... and receiving from this act its unity, its common identity, its life and its will.
Page 13 - And now, as he looked and saw the whole Hellespont covered with the vessels of his fleet, and all the shore and every plain about Abydos as full as possible of men, Xerxes congratulated himself on his good fortune; but after a little while he wept.
Page 304 - This done, the multitude so united in one person, is called a COMMONWEALTH, in Latin CIVITAS. This is the generation of that great LEVIATHAN, or rather, to speak more reverently, of that mortal god, to which we owe under the immortal God, our peace and defence.
Page 55 - I will omit much usual declamation on the dignity and capacity of our nature ; the superiority of the soul to the body, of the rational to the animal part of our constitution ; upon the worthiness, refinement, and delicacy of some satisfactions, or the meanness, grossness, and sensuality of others ; because I hold that pleasures differ in nothing but in continuance and intensity...
Page 298 - In such condition there is no place for industry, because the fruit thereof is uncertain, and consequently no culture of the earth, no navigation nor use of the commodities that may be imported by sea, no commodious building, no instruments of moving and removing such things as require much force, no knowledge of the face of the earth; no account of time, no arts, no letters, no society, and, which is worst of all, continual fear and danger of violent death, and the life of man solitary, poor, nasty,...

Bibliographic information