Transactions and Journal: Index, Volumes 1-29

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The Association, 1916
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Page v - The Worthington Disc Meter combines minimum weight with reliability on constant service and accuracy of registration. The Worthington Turbine Meter is designed primarily to handle large volumes of water with minimum loss of pressure. Full descriptions of the different types of Worthington Meters, with tables of sizes and capacities, are given in Bulletin \V 184-54.
Page xii - Meter has been accepted for thirteen years in 3," 4: 6: 8: 10" and 12" sizes without any restrictions or conditions of any kind by every Insurance Company, Stock and Mutual, doing business in the United States, and by the Water Departments and Water Companies in more than...
Page 28 - Apportionment of Charges for Private Fire Protection and the Means of Controlling the Supply Thereto.
Page xii - Meter has been accepted for eleven years in 3' 4", 6" 8: 10" and 12" sizes without any restrictions or conditions of any kind by every Insurance Company, Stock and Mutual, doing business in the United States, and by the Water Departments and Wat er Companies in more than 500 Cities and Towns for use on over 3,ooo Fire Services protecting nearly ^2.000.000.000.
Page 61 - Practice of the Edward P. Allis Co. Compared with that of Twenty-five Years Ago. Jour. New Eng.
Page 55 - Decarbonation as a Means of Removing the Corrosive Properties of Public Water Supplies.
Page 80 - Some new facts relating to the Effect of Meters on the Consumption of Water.
Page 87 - The Water Supplies of the New York Metropolitan District, with Special Reference to Their Purification.
Page 62 - On the Protection of Public Water Supplies from Pollution During the Construction, Maintenance, and Operation of Railroads, with Special Reference to the Water Supply of Seattle, Washington; Together with Criticisms of the Present Methods of Water Supply and Sewerage of Railway Trains.
Page 46 - The Mississippi River as the source of water supply for the inhabitants of the Mississippi Valley.

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