The Next Hundred Million: America in 2050

Front Cover
Penguin Publishing Group, 2011 - Business & Economics - 308 pages
2 Reviews
A visionary social thinker reveals how the addition of one hundred million Americans by midcentury will transform the way we live, work, and prosper.

In stark contrast to the rest of the world's advanced nations, the United States is growing at a record rate, and, according to census projections, will be home to four hundred million Americans by 2050. Drawing on prodigious research, firsthand reportage, and historical analysis, acclaimed forecaster Joel Kotkin reveals how this unprecedented growth will take shape-and why it is the greatest indicator of the nation's long-term economic strength. At a time of great pessimism about America's future, The Next Hundred Million shows why the United States will emerge a stronger and more diverse nation by midcentury.

What people are saying - Write a review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - Daniel.Estes - LibraryThing

The majority criticism aimed at this book appears to come from flawed premises. "America cannot sustain its people now never mind another 100 million," some have said. Also, there is a severe ... Read full review

THE NEXT HUNDRED MILLION: America in 2050

User Review  - Jane Doe - Kirkus

Think you have trouble finding a parking space today? Wait until 2050, when the American population will have grown by another 100 million.According to Forbes columnist Kotkin (The City: A Global ... Read full review

Other editions - View all

About the author (2011)

Joel Kotkin is a senior fellow with the Davenport Institute for Public Policy at Pepperdine University, a research fellow in urban studies at the Reason Public Policy Institute, and a senior fellow with the Milken Institute. He writes a monthly column, "Grass Roots Business," in the Sunday New York Times Money & Business section, and is a contributing editor to the Los Angeles Times Opinion section as well as a columnist for the Los Angeles Business Journal. An active participant in the new economy, he is director of content for Prime Ventures, a high-tech venture-capital firm specializing in new-media and technology ventures. He has written four previous books, including Tribes. He lives in North Hollywood, California.

Bibliographic information