Physician and Patient, Or, A Practical View of the Mutual Duties, Relations and Interests of the Medical Profession and the Community

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Richard Bentley, 1850 - Medical ethics - 303 pages
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Page 143 - ... suffer such publications to be made — to invite laymen to be present at operations — to boast of cures and remedies — to adduce certificates of skill and success, or to perform any other similar acts. These are the ordinary practices of empirics, and are highly reprehensible in a regular physician.
Page 136 - Frequent visits to the sick are, in general, requisite, since they enable the physician to arrive at a more perfect knowledge of the disease — to meet promptly every change which may occur, and also tend to preserve the confidence of the patient. But unnecessary visits are to be avoided, as they give useless anxiety to the patient, tend to diminish the authority of the physician, and render him liable to be suspected of interested motives.
Page 149 - Should an irreconcilable diversity of opinion occur when several physicians are called upon to consult together, the opinion of the majority should be considered as decisive ; but if the numbers be equal on each side, then the decision should rest with the attending physician. It may, moreover, sometimes happen that two physicians cannot agree in their views of the nature of a case and the treatment to be pursued. This is a circumstance much to be deplored, and should always be avoided, if possible,...
Page 156 - ... in regard to measures for the prevention of epidemic and contagious diseases; and when pestilence prevails, it is their duty to face the danger, and to continue their labors for the alleviation of the suffering, even at the jeopardy of their own lives.
Page 137 - A Physician ought not to abandon his patient because the case is deemed incurable ; for his attendance may continue to be highly useful to the patient, and comforting to the relatives around him, even in the last period of a fatal malady, by alleviating pain and other symptoms, and by soothing mental anguish.
Page 142 - Every individual, on entering the profession, as he becomes thereby entitled to all its privileges and immunities, incurs an obligation to exert his best abilities to maintain its dignity and honor, to exalt its standing, and to extend the bounds of its usefulness.
Page 143 - It is also incumbent upon the faculty to be temperate in all things, for the practice of physic requires the unremitting exercise of a clear and vigorous understanding ; and, on emergencies, for which no professional man should be unprepared, a steady hand, an acute eye, and an unclouded head may be essential to the well-being, and even to the life, of a fellowcreature. 3. It is derogatory to the dignity of the profession to resort to public advertisements...
Page 223 - For who, to dumb Forgetfulness a prey, This pleasing anxious being e'er resigned, Left the warm precincts of the cheerful day, Nor cast one longing lingering look behind?
Page 144 - Equally derogatory to professional character is it for a physician to hold a patent for any surgical instrument or medicine ; or to dispense a secret nostrum, whether it be the composition or exclusive property of himself or of others.
Page 141 - Patients should always, when practicable, send for their physician in the morning, before his usual hour of going out ; for, by being early aware of the visits he has to pay during the day, the physician is able to apportion his time in such a manner as to prevent an interference of engagements. Patients should also avoid calling on their medical advisers unnecessarily during the hours devoted to meals or sleep.

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