The Tipping Point: How Little Things Can Make a Big Difference

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Little, Brown, Nov 1, 2006 - Business & Economics - 288 pages
2036 Reviews
The tipping point is that magic moment when an idea, trend, or social behavior crosses a threshold, tips, and spreads like wildfire. Just as a single sick person can start an epidemic of the flu, so too can a small but precisely targeted push cause a fashion trend, the popularity of a new product, or a drop in the crime rate. This widely acclaimed bestseller, in which Malcolm Gladwell explores and brilliantly illuminates the tipping point phenomenon, is already changing the way people throughout the world think about selling products and disseminating ideas.

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Review: The Tipping Point: How Little Things Can Make a Big Difference

User Review  - Troy - Goodreads

When I picked this book up, I was expecting it to be a business book. Turned out to be a book about social psychology and how the little things influence big trends and epidemics. Super interesting ... Read full review

Review: The Tipping Point: How Little Things Can Make a Big Difference

User Review  - Sarah - Goodreads

Would have worked better as a long-form article rather than a book. Read full review

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The Law of the
The Stickiness Factor
The Power of Context Part One
The Power of Context Part Two
Case Study

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About the author (2006)

Malcolm Gladwell, non-fiction writer and journalist, was born in England on Sept 3, 1963. He was raised in rural Ontario and graduated from the University of Toronto, Trinity College, with a degree in History. Gladwell was previously a business and science reporter for the Washington Post and is currently a staff writer with the New Yorker magazine. He is well-known for his many New York Times bestselling books: Blink, The Tipping Point, Outliers, What the Dog Saw, and David and Goliath. His writing is often a product of sociology and psychology with implications for the social sciences and business. Gladwell became a successful public speaker after writing his bestselling books. In 2005, Time Magazine named Gladwell one of its 100 most influential people. Gladwell's most famous quote comes from his book, Outliers; he states that "It takes about 10,000 hours of practice to become an expert..." at any competition or task. Gladwell was appointed to the Order of Canada on June 30, 2011. Gladwell describes himself as a Christian. He was raised in the Mennonite tradition, and wandered away from his Christian roots when he moved to New York, only to rediscover his faith during the writing of David and Goliath and through his encounter with Wilma Derksen. In 2005, Gladwell commanded approximately $45,000 for his speaking fee. His books include: Outliers, Blink, What the Dog Saw, and David and Goliath.

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