Decoding the Universe: How the New Science of Information Is Explaining Everythingin the Cosmos, fromOu r Brains to Black Holes

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Penguin, Jan 30, 2007 - Computers - 304 pages
5 Reviews
The author of Zero explains the scientific revolution that is transforming the way we understand our world

Previously the domain of philosophers and linguists, information theory has now moved beyond the province of code breakers to become the crucial science of our time. In Decoding the Universe, Charles Seife draws on his gift for making cutting-edge science accessible to explain how this new tool is deciphering everything from the purpose of our DNA to the parallel universes of our Byzantine cosmos. The result is an exhilarating adventure that deftly combines cryptology, physics, biology, and mathematics to cast light on the new understanding of the laws that govern life and the universe.

 

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - tgraettinger - LibraryThing

Delivers a good cross section of entropy and information across engineering, biology, and physics. Liked it more than, "The Bit and the Pendulum". This book had better explanations, for my taste. Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - Antoinette.M-- - LibraryThing

This book changed how I think about evolution. When you think about information, rather than species, attempting to survive, things like viruses and jumping genes make perfect sense. Read full review

Contents

INTRODUCTION
CHAPTER 1
CHAPTER 2
CHAPTER 3
CHAPTER 4
CHAPTER 5
CHAPTER 6
CHAPTER 7
CHAPTER 8
CHAPTER 9
APPENDIX A
APPENDIX B
SELECTBIBLIOGRAPHY
ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
INDEX
Copyright

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About the author (2007)

Charles Seife is the author of five previous books, including Proofiness and Zero, which won the PEN/Martha Albrand Award for first nonfiction and was a New York Times notable book. He has written for a wide variety of publications, including The New York Times, Wired, New Scientist, Science, Scientific American, and The Economist. He is a professor of journalism at New York University and lives in New York City.

 

 

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