Elements of Mental Philosophy, Embracing the Two Departments of the Intellect and the Sensibilities, Volume 2

Front Cover
Harper & brothers., 1856 - Psychology
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Contents

Remarks on the beauty of forms The circle
44
Original or intrinsic beauty The circle
45
Of the beauty of straight and angular forms
46
Of square pyramidal and triangular forms
48
The variety of the sources of that beauty which is founded on forms illustrated from the different styles of architecture
49
Of the original or intrinsic beauty of colours
50
Further illustrations of the original beauty of colours
52
Of sounds considered as a source of beauty
54
Illustrations of the original beauty of sounds
55
Further instances of the original beauty of sounds
58
The permanency of musical power dependant on its being intrinsic
59
Of motion as an element of beauty
60
Explanations of the beauty of motion from Kaimes
61
Of a distinct sense or faculty of beauty
63
associated beauty 40 Associated beauty implies an antecedent or intrinsic beauty
64
Objects may become beautiful by association merely
65
Further illustrations of associated feelings
66
Instances of national associations
68
The sources of associated beauty coincident with those of human happiness
69
Of fitness considered as an element of associated beauty
70
Of utility as an element of associated beauty
71
Of proportion as an element of associated beauty
72
Relations of emotions of beauty to the fine arts
73
Differences of original susceptibility of this emotion
74
Objection to the doctrine of original beauty
75
Summary of views in regard to the beautiful
76
Of picturesque beauty
77
emotions of sublimity 53 Connexion between beauty and sublimity
78
The occasions of the emotions of sublimity various
79
Great extent or expansion an occasion of sublimity
80
Of depth in connexion with the sublime
81
Of colours in connexion with the sublime
82
Of sounds as furnishing an occasion of sublime emotions
83
Of motion in connexion with the sublime
84
Of moral worth in connexion with sublimity
85
Sublime objects have some elements of beauty
86
Emotions of grandeur
87
Considerations in proof of the original sublimity of objects
88
Influence of association on emotions of sublimity
89
Furtner illustrations of sublimity from association
90
Definition of taste and some of its characteristics
91
Distinguishable from mere quickness of feeling or sensibility
92
Of the process involved in the formation of taste 03
93
Instantaneousness of the decisions of taste
94
Of the permanency of beauty
95
General nature of emotions of the ludicrous
97
Of Hobbess account of the ludicrous 98
98
Of what is to be understood by wit 99
99
Of wit when employed in aggrandizing objects 90 Of other methods of exciting emotions of the ludicrous 101
101
Of the character and occasions of humour 102
102
Of the practical utility of feelings of the ludicrous 02
103
Emotions of cheerfulness joy and gladness
104
Emotions of surprise astonishment and wonder
105
Emotions of dissatisfaction displeasure and disgust
106
Emotions of diffidence modesty and shame
107
Emotions of regard reverence and adoration
108
PART FIRST NATURAL OR PATHEMATIC SENSIBILITIES NATURAL OK PATHEMATIC SENTIMENTS CLASS SECOND THE DESIRES
109
Of the prevalence of desire in this department of the mind Ill 90 The nature of desires known from consciousness
111
Of the place of desires in relation to other mental states
112
Of an exception to the foregoing statement
113
The desires characterized by comparative fixedness and permanency
114
Desires always imply an object desired
115
The fulfilment of desires attended with enjoyment
116
Tendency to excite movement an attribute of desire
117
Classification of this part of the sensibilities
118
The principles based upon desire susceptible of a twofold operation
119
Of the nature of the instincts of brute animals
120
1j2 Instincts susceptible of slight modifications
122
Instances of instincts in the human mind
123
Further instances of instincts in men
125
Of the final cause or use of instincts
126
ClIAP HI APPETITES 100 Of the general nature and characteristics of the appetites
127
Of the prevalence and origin of appetites for intoxicating drugs
128
Of occasional desires for action and repose
129
Of the twofold operation and morality of the appetites
130
propensities 111 General remarks on the nature of the propensities
131
Of the twofold action of the principle of self preservation
132
Of curiosity or the desire of knowledge
133
Further illustrations of the principle of curiosity
134
Of the twofold operation and the morality of the principle of cu riosity
136
Imitativeness or the propensity to imitation
137
Practical results of the principle of imitation
138
Remarks on the subject of emulation
140
Emulation resolvable inlo the principle of imitativeness
141
Of the natural desire of esteem
143
Of ihe desire of esteem as a rule of conduct
145
Of acquisitiveness or the desire of possession
146
Of perversions of the possessory desire
148
Facts in proof of the natural desire of power
149
Of the moral character of the desire of power
150
Veracity or the propensity to utter the truth
151
Of the twofold action of the propensity to truth
152
Propensity of selflove or the desire of happiness
153
Of selfishness as distinguished from self love
154
Modifications of selfishness pride vanity and arrogance
155
Reference to the opinions of philosophical writers
156
Proofs of the natural desire of society from the confessions and conduct of those who have been deprived of it
165
Further proofs and illustrations of the natural origin of the prin ciple of sociality
166
Other illustrations of a similar kind
168
Other instances in illustration of the same subject
169
The subject illustrated from experiments in prison discipline
170
Relation of ihe social principle to civil society
172
Of the form of desire denominated hope
173
the malevolent affections 174 175 176 170 177 151 Of the comparative rank of the affections
174
Of the complex nature of the affections
175
Of resentment or anger 154 Illustrations of instinctive resentment
176
Uses and moral character of instinctive resentment
177
15C Of voluntary in distinction from instinctive resentment
178
Tendency of anger to excess and the natural checks to it
179
Other reasons for checking and subduing the angry passions
180
Modifications of resentment Peevishness
182
Modifications of resentment Envy
183
Modifications of resentment Revenge
185
Nature of the passion of fear
186
the benevolent affections 165 Of the nature of love or benevolence in general
188
Love in its various forms characterized by a twofold action
189
Illustrations of the strength of the parental affection
191
Of the filial affection
192
The filial affection original or implanted
193
Illustrations of the filial affection
194
Of the nature of the fraternal affection
196
Of the utility of the domestic affections
197
Of the moral character of the domestic affections and of the be nevolent affections generally
198
Of the moral character of the voluntary exercise of the benevolent affections
199
Of the connexion between benevolence and rectitude
200
Of the origin of secondary active principles
201
Of humanity or the love of the human race
202
Further proofs in support of the doctrine of an innate humanity or love for the human race
203
Further illustrations of the foregoing instances
204
Proofs of a humane or philanthropic principle from the existence of benevolent institutions
205
Other remarks in proof of the same doctrine
207
Objection from the contests and wars among mankind
209
The objection drawn from wars further considered
211
Illustration of the statements of the foregoing section
212
Of patriotism or love of country
213
Of the affection of friendship
214
Of the affection of pity or sympathy
216
Of the moral character of pity
217
Of the affection of gratitude
218
Man created originally with the principle of love to God
220
That man was originally created with a principle of love to God further shown from the Scriptures
221
Further proofs that man was thus created
223
Illustration of the results of the principle of love to God from the character and life of the Saviour
225
The absence of this principle attended with an excessive and sin ful action of other principles
226
Further illustrations of the results of the absence of this principle
228
Views of President Edwards on the subject of human depravity
230
ther considered
242
The objection noticed in connexion with the malevolent affections
243
PART SECOND THE MOKAL SENSIBILITIES OK CONSCIENCE MORAL OR CONSCIENTIOUS SENTIMENTS CLASS FIRST
245
Bection Page 207 Reference to the general division
247
Proof of a moral nature from consciousness
248
Proofs of a moral nature from the manner of our intercourse with our fellowmen
250
Proofs of a moral nature from the terms used in different languages
251
Proofs from the operation of the passions of anger and gratitude
252
Proofs of a moral nature from feelings of remorse
253
Evidence of a moral nature from the ideas of merit and demerit reward and punishment
254
Proofs from the uniformity of law
255
Evidences of a moral nature even among Savage nations
258
Further remarks on the morality of Savage tribes
259
The existence of civil or political society implies a moral nature
260
A moral nature implied in the motives of human conduct which are recognised in historical works
261
Evidence of a moral nature from Scripture
262
Concluding remarks on the general fact of a moral nature
263
emotions of moral approval and disapproval 223 Classification of the moral sensibilities
264
Nature of the moral emotions of approval and disapproval
265
Of the place or position mentally considered of the emotions of approval and disapproval
266
Changes in the moral emotions take place in accordance with changes in the antecedent perceptions
267
Of objects of moral approval and disapproval
268
Of the original ground or basis of moral approbation and disappro bation
269
Emotions of moral approval are called forth in connexion with the existence of right or rectitude in the things approved of
271
Of the doctrine which confounds reasoning and conscience
272
nature of moral beauty
280
nature of moral sublimity
286
rity or justice 289 247 Other instances of the sublimity of justice 290 248 Instances of friendship and the parental affection illustrative of the subject ...
293
Proof of the existence of obligatory feelings from consciousness 297 253 Further proof from the conduct of men 298 254 Further proof from langu...
300
Feelings of obligation subsequent in time to the moral emotions of approval and disapproval 305 262 Feelings of obligation differ from desires 306 ...
307
ciple on which it is regulated 308 265 The nature of conscience considered as a uniform principle of action requires that it should vary in its decision...
313
Further illustrations of the influence of wrong speculative opinions 318 274 Of the effect of wrong speculative opinions among heathen tribes 318 2...
320
bers and outlaws from society 325 280 Illustration of the fact that there are the remains of conscientious feeling even in the most depraved of men
326
immutability of moral distinctions 283 Remarks on the reality of right and wrongand on the standard of rectitude which is involved in their existence...
333
The immutability of moral distinctions thirdly from the opera
340
Supreme Being 349 295 Of the proofs of this doctrine from the appeals which are made in various parts of the Scriptures 351 296 Remarks in conclu...
353
The mind must be occupied at an early period either with good or bad principles 355 299 Of the time when moral instruction and discipline ought to...
365
J09 Of the disordered and alienated action of the appetites 370 310 Disordered action of the principle of selfpreservation
372
Of the disordered action of the desire of esteem 378 317 Disordered action of the desire of power 380 318 Disordered action of the principle of vera...
381
Instances of sympathetic imitation at the poorhouse at Haerlem
387
Section Flga
392
Of intermissions of hypochondriasis 397 333 Disordered action of the passion of fear 399 334 Perversions of the benevolent affections
400
Of natural or congenital moral derangement 404 338 Of moral accountability in cases of natural or congenital moral derangement
406
Casual associations in respect to persons 411 345 Casual association in connexion with objects and places
413
oral signs or speech
431
characteristics of languages
459

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 82 - tis, to cast one's eyes so low! The crows and choughs, that wing the midway air, Show scarce so gross as beetles : Half way down Hangs one that gathers samphire; dreadful trade! Methinks, he seems no bigger than his head: The fishermen, that walk upon the beach, Appear like mice; and yon...
Page 263 - For when the Gentiles, which have not the law, do by nature the things contained in the law, these, having not the law, are a law unto themselves ; which show the work of the law written in their hearts, their conscience also bearing witness, and their thoughts the mean while accusing or else excusing one another ;) in the day when God shall judge the secrets of men by Jesus Christ, according to my Gospel.
Page 83 - The voice of the Lord is upon the waters: the God of glory thundereth: the Lord is upon many waters.
Page 98 - I may therefore conclude, that the passion of laughter is nothing else but sudden glory arising from some sudden conception of some eminency in ourselves, by comparison with the infirmity of others, or with our own formerly...
Page 82 - He bowed the heavens also, and came down : and darkness was under his feet. And he rode upon a cherub, and did fly : yea, he did fly upon the wings of the wind.
Page 89 - AND I saw another mighty angel come down from heaven, clothed with a cloud : and a rainbow was upon his head, and his face was as it were the sun, and his feet as pillars of fire...
Page 286 - The Sun of Righteousness has been gradually drawing nearer and nearer, appearing larger and brighter as he approached; and now he fills the whole hemisphere, pouring forth a flood of glory, in which I seem to float like an insect in the beams of the sun, exulting, yet almost trembling, while I gaze on this excessive brightness, and wondering with unutterable wonder why God should deign thus to shine upon a sinful worm.
Page 100 - The sun had long since in the lap Of Thetis taken out his nap, And like a lobster boiled, the morn From black to red began to turn," The imagination modifies images, and gives unity to variety ; it sees all things in one, il piti nelV uno.
Page 285 - The sun shall be no more thy light by day, neither for brightness shall the moon give light unto thee; but the Lord shall be unto thee an everlasting light, and thy God thy glory. Thy sun shall no more go down, neither shall thy moon withdraw itself: for the Lord shall be thine everlasting light, and the days of thy mourning shall be ended.
Page 352 - Hear ye the word of the Lord, O house of Jacob, and all the families of the house of Israel : thus saith the Lord, What iniquity have your fathers found in me, that they are gone far from me, and have walked after vanity, and are become vain...

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