The Immaterial Self: A Defence of the Cartesian Dualist Conception of the Mind

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Routledge, 1991 - Philosophy - 298 pages
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Dualism argues that the mind is more than just the brain. It holds that there exists two very different realms, one mental and the other physical. Both are fundamental and one cannot be reduced to the other - there are minds and there is a physical world. This book examines and defends the most famous dualist account of the mind, the cartesian, which attributes the immaterial contents of the mind to an immaterial self.
John Foster's new book exposes the inadequacies of the dominant materialist and reductionist accounts of the mind. In doing so he is in radical conflict with the current philosophical establishment. Ambitious and controversial, The Immaterial Self is the most powerful and effective defence of Cartesian dualism since Descartes' own

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About the author (1991)

John Foster is a world-renowned designer, author and speaker on design issues. His work has been published in numerous books and every major industry magazine, hangs in galleries across the globe and is part of the permanent collection of the Smithsonian. He is the proud recipient of both a gold and silver medal from the Art Directors Club as well as a Best of Show from the ADDYs. He currently resides in Derwood, MD. Visit his blog at http: //www.badpeoplegoodthings.com.

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