Language Learning and Deafness

Front Cover
Cambridge University Press, Jan 29, 1988 - Foreign Language Study - 301 pages
An important new collection of original papers dealing with essential issues and research in the learning of language by deaf people. The book addresses issues in the fields of second language acquisition and deafness, and draws upon the fields of linguistics, psychology, and education. Of particular importance is the relationship between the learning of English by the deaf and by hearing speakers of other languages. The first five chapters concern theoretical issues on language varieties among the deaf population, American sign language and the biology of language, sign language instruction, and language education of deaf children from both historical and bilingual perspectives. The second half of the book contains six original, previously unpublished research reports on topics related to language learning by deaf children and adults.
 

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Contents

American Sign Language and the human biological
49
The history of language use in the education of the Deaf
75
Sign language instruction and its implications for
99
A bilingual approach to the education of young deaf
113
An assessment of syntactic capabilities
133
Childrens new sign creations
162
Linguistic and cultural role models for hearingimpaired
184
Development of vocal and signed communication in deaf
220
Questions and answers in the development of deaf
261
Index
293
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