Narrow Roads of Gene Land: Volume 1: Evolution of Social Behaviour

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Spektrum Academic Publishers, 2005 - History - 552 pages
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Why is `blood thicker than water'? Are we innately violent or pacific? What is the best sex ratio? Why are plants and animals sexual? Why do we grow old and die? Over what do our chromosomes quarrel? Such questions have motivated the life-work of W. D. Hamilton, widely acknowledged as the most important theoretical biologist of the 20th century. His papers continue to exert an enormous influence and they are now being republished for the first time. Each one is introduced by an autobiographical essay written especially for this collection. This first volume contains all of Hamilton's publications prior to 1981, a set especially relevant to social behaviour, kinship theory, sociobiology, and the notion of `selfish genes'. It includes several of the most read and famous papers of modern biology. A forthcoming volume will be devoted to the second half of Hamilton's life's work, on sex and sexual selection. Narrow Roads of Gene Land will be welcomed by professionals, graduate students, and undergraduates from a variety of disciplines, including evolution, population genetics, animal behaviour, genetics, anthropology, and ecology. The essays are accessible to non-specialists and will fascinate and entertain general readers with an interest in evolution and behaviour.
 

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Contents

Shoulders of Giants
1
Hamiltons Rule
11
Live Now Pay Later
85
4
93
Gender and Genome
131
Spite and Price
171
6
177
America
185
10
324
Venus Too Kind
353
11
369
12
384
13
396
Discordant Insects
423
14
433
Astringent Leaves
485

Panic Stations
229
Altruism and related phenomena mainly in social insects
255
Advanced Arts of Exit
499
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About the author (2005)

W. D. Hamilton is a Royal Society Research Professor in the Department of Zoology at the University of Oxford. He is known throughout the world for his work on social evolution and sexual selection. He is a fellow of the Royal Society and a Foreign Honorary Member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. W.D. Hamilton, Department of Zoology, University of Oxford, South Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PS. Tel. 01865-271166.