China and the United States: A New Cold War History

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University Press of America, Dec 11, 1997 - History - 356 pages
This essay collection presents a new examination and fresh insight into Sino-American relations from the end of World War II to the 1960s. The compilation breaks new ground by exploring some of the untouched Chinese and Soviet Communist sources to document the major events and crises in East Asia. It also identifies a new pattern of confrontations between China and America during the Cold War. Based on extensive multi-archival research utilizing recently-released records, the authors move the study away from the usual Soviet-American rivalry and instead focus on the relatively unknown area of communists' interactions and conflicts in order to answer questions such as why Beijing sent troops to Korea, what role China played in the Vietnam War, and why Mao caused crises in the Taiwan Straits. The articles in the book examine Chinese perceptions and positions, and discuss the nature and goals of China's foreign policy and its impact on Sino-American relations during this crucial period.
 

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Contents

Part II Interaction beyond Ideologies
119
Part III Americans through Chinese Eyes
207
About the Contributors
347

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About the author (1997)

Xiaobing Li is Assistant Professor of History and Associate Director of the Western Pacific Institute at the University of Central Oklahoma in Edmond, Oklahoma. Hongshan Li is a member of the History Department at Kent State University in New Philadelphia, Ohio.

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