The Black Tulip

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Penguin Books Limited, Apr 24, 2003 - Fiction - 246 pages
29 Reviews
Cornelius von Baerle lives only to cultivate the elusive black tulip and win a magnificent prize for its creation. But when his powerful godfather is assassinated, the unwitting Cornelius becomes caught up in a deadly political intrigue. Falsely accused of high treason by a bitter rival, Cornelius is condemned to life in prison. His only comfort is Rosa, the jailer's beautiful daughter, who helps him concoct a plan to grow the black tulip in secret. As Robin Buss explains in his informative introduction, Dumas infuses his story with elements from the history of the Dutch Republic (including two brutal murders) and Holland's seventeenth-century "tulipmania" phenomenon.
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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - mrsdanaalbasha - LibraryThing

The Black Tulip is a historical novel written by Alexandre Dumas, père. The story begins with a historical event — the 1672 lynching of the Dutch Grand Pensionary (roughly equivalent to a modern ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - jcbrunner - LibraryThing

The main part of the novel is basically a sweet romance between the jailkeeper's daughter Rose and the innocent political prisoner Cornelius van Baerle. Before the romance takes place, however, the ... Read full review

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About the author (2003)

Alexandre Dumaswas born in 1802 at Villers-Cotterêts. His father, the illegitimate son of a marquis, was a general in the Revolutionary armies, but died when Dumas was only four. He was brought up in straitened circumstances and received very little education. He joined the household of the future king, Louis-Philippe, and began reading voraciously. Later he entered the cénacle of Charles Nodier and started writing.

In 1829 the production of his play, Henri III et sa Cour, heralded twenty years of successful playwriting. In 1839 he turned his attention to writing historical novels, often using collaborators such as Auguste Maquet to suggest plots or historical background. His most successful novels are The Count of Monte Cristo, which appeared during 1844-5, and The Three Musketeers, published in 1844. Other novels deal with the wars of religion and the Revolution. Dumas wrote many of these for the newspapers, often in daily instalments, marshalling his formidable energies to produce ever more in order to pay off his debts. In addition, he wrote travel books, children's stories and his Mémoires which describe most amusingly his early life, his entry into Parisian literary circles and the 1830 Revolution. He died in 1870.

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