Observatory Seismology: An Anniversary Symposium on the Occasion of the Centennial of the University of California at Berkeley Seismographic Stations

Front Cover
Joe J. Litehiser
University of California Press, Jan 1, 1989 - Science - 379 pages
The first effective seismographs were built between 1879 and 1890. In 1885, E. S. Holden, an astronomer and then president of the University of California, instigated the purchase of the best available instruments of the time "to keep a register of all earthquake shocks in order to be able to control the positions of astronomical instruments." These seismographs were installed two years later at Lick Observatory on Mt. Hamilton and at the Berkeley campus of the University. Over the years those stations have been upgraded and joined by other seismographic stations administered at Berkeley, to become the oldest continuously operating stations in the Western Hemisphere. The first hundred years of the Seismographic Stations of the University of California at Berkeley, years in which seismology has often assumed an unforeseen role in issues of societal and political importance, ended in 1987.
To celebrate the centennial a distinguished group of fellows, staff, and friends of the Stations met on the Berkeley campus in May 1987. The papers they presented are gathered in this book, a distillation of the current state of the art in observatory seismology. Ranging through subjects of past, present, and future seismological interest, they provide a benchmark reference for years to come. The first effective seismographs were built between 1879 and 1890. In 1885, E. S. Holden, an astronomer and then president of the University of California, instigated the purchase of the best available instruments of the time "to keep a register of all earthquake shocks in order to be able to control the positions of astronomical instruments." These seismographs were installed two years later at Lick Observatory on Mt. Hamilton and at the Berkeley campus of the University. Over the years those stations have been upgraded and joined by other seismographic stations administered at Berkeley, to become the oldest continuously operating stations in the Western Hemisphere. The first hundred years of the Seismographic Stations of the University of California at Berkeley, years in which seismology has often assumed an unforeseen role in issues of societal and political importance, ended in 1987.
To celebrate the centennial a distinguished group of fellows, staff, and friends of the Stations met on the Berkeley campus in May 1987. The papers they presented are gathered in this book, a distillation of the current state of the art in observatory seismology. Ranging through subjects of past, present, and future seismological interest, they provide a benchmark reference for years to come.
 

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Contents

One Hundred Years of Contributions of the University of California
24
Part II
50
Progress and Promise
64
LargeScale Processing and Analysis of Digital Waveform Data from
86
Seismographic Recording at Berkeley 18871987
109
Array SeismologyPast Present and Future Developments
123
Seismicity Map of North America
157
Seismicity of the Australian Plate and Its Pacific Plate Margin
168
Hypocenter Mapping and the Extensibility
225
Part IV
234
Development of FaultPlane Studies for the Mechanism
243
Deterministic and Stochastic Approaches
257
Seismic Energy Spectrum and the Savage
279
Constraints from Seismograms on the Physical Characteristics
303
Studies Using Global Seismological Networks
320
Love and Rayleigh Waves in Irregular Structures
333

State of Stress in Seismic Gaps along the San Jacinto Fault
179
The Need for Local Arrays in Mapping the Lithosphere
187
Dense Microearthquake Network Study of Northern California
199
AppendixScientific Program
366
Copyright

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About the author (1989)

Joe J. Litehiser is lead seismologist with the Bechtel Group in San Francisco.

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