Constable's miscellany of original and selected publications

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1829
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Page 20 - suffer being here below ? The lamb thy riot dooms to bleed to-day, Had he thy reason, would he skip and play ? Pleas'd to the last, he crops the flowery food, And licks the hand just rais'd to shed his blood. POPE.
Page 278 - no less than the conversion of three kingdoms, and by that, perhaps, the utter subduing of a pestilent heresy, which has a long time domineered over this northern world. There never were such hopes of success, since the days of Queen Mary, as now in our days.
Page 31 - AVith a near aim, of the main chance of things As yet not come to life, which in their seeds, And weak beginnings, be intreasured.
Page 304 - this is your Presbyterian cant; truly called to be Bishops, that is, himself and such rascals called to be Bishops of Kidderminster, and other such places; Bishops set apart by such factious snivelling Presbyterians as himself; a Kidderminster Bishop he means, according to the saying of a late learned author,
Page 20 - I. Heaven from all creatures hides the book of fate, All but the page prescribed, their present state: From brutes what men, from men what spirits know, Or who would suffer being here below ? The lamb thy riot dooms to bleed to-day, Had he thy reason, would he skip and play ? Pleas'd to the last, he crops the flowery food, And licks the hand just rais'd to shed his blood.
Page 38 - were brought to day. 1 cannot tell how the truth may be, I say the tale as 'twas said to me. Lay of the Last Minstrel.
Page 298 - a damnable and hellish plot, contrived and carried on by the Popish recusants, for assassinating and murdering the King, for subverting the government, and for rooting out and destroying the Protestant religion.
Page 303 - and he says he suffers for the truth, and so does Baxter; but if Baxter did but stand on the other side of the pillory with him, I would say that two of
Page 31 - II. There is a history in all men's lives, Figuring the nature of the times deccas'd; The which
Page 104 - with a great chain of gold about his neck to the value of five hundred crowns; and four blowing-horns with both the ends of gold and silk, set with precious stone*.

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