Public and Performance in the Greek Theatre

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Routledge, Sep 11, 2002 - History - 216 pages
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Peter Arnott discusses Greek drama not as an antiquarian study but as a living art form. He removes the plays from the library and places them firmly in the theatre that gave them being. Invoking the practical realities of stagecraft, he illuminates the literary patterns of the plays, the performance disciplines, and the audience responses.
Each component of the productions - audience, chorus, actors, costume, speech - is examined in the context of its own society and of theatre practice in general, with examples from other cultures. Professor Arnott places great emphasis on the practical staging of Greek plays, and how the buildings themselves imposed particular constraints on actors and writers alike. Above all, he sets out to make practical sense of the construction of Greek plays, and their organic relationship to their original setting.
 

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Contents

INTRODUCTION
1
1 THE AUDIENCE AND THE CHORUS
5
2 THE ACTOR SEEN
44
3 THE ACTOR HEARD
74
4 DEBATE AND DRAMA
105
5 PLACE AND TIME
132
6 CHARACTER AND CONTINUITY
162
NOTES
193
SELECT BIBLIOGRAPHY
198
INDEX
199
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