Dubliners

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Penguin Books, 1996 - Fiction - 492 pages
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"Don't you think there is a certain resemblance between the mystery of the Mass and what I am trying to do'...To give people some kind of intellectual pleasure or spiritual enjoyment by converting the bread of everyday life into something that has a permanent artistic life of its own."

-- James Joyce, in a letter to his brother

With these fifteen stories James Joyce reinvented the art of fiction, using a scrupulous, deadpan realism to convey truths that were at once blasphemous and sacramental. Whether writing about the death of a fallen priest ("The Sisters"), the petty sexual and fiscal machinations of "Two Gallants," or of the Christmas party at which an uprooted intellectual discovers just how little he really knows about his wife ("The Dead"), Joyce takes narrative places it had never been before.

The text of this edition has been newly edited by Hans Walter Gabler and Walter Hettche and is followed by a new afterword, chronology, and bibliography by John S. Kelly. Also included in a special appendix are the original versions of three stories as well as Joyce's long-suppressed Preface to Dubliners.

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About the author (1996)

James Joyce was born on February 2, 1882, in Dublin, Ireland, into a large Catholic family. Joyce was a very good pupil, studying poetics, languages, and philosophy at Clongowes Wood College, Belvedere College, and the Royal University in Dublin. Joyce taught school in Dalkey, Ireland, before marrying in 1904. Joyce lived in Zurich and Triest, teaching languages at Berlitz schools, and then settled in Paris in 1920 where he figured prominently in the Parisian literary scene, as witnessed by Ernest Hemingway's A Moveable Feast. Joyce's collection of fine short stories, Dubliners, was published in 1914, to critical acclaim. Joyce's major works include A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man, Ulysses, Finnegans Wake, and Stephen Hero. Ulysses, published in 1922, is considered one of the greatest English novels of the 20th century. The book simply chronicles one day in the fictional life of Leopold Bloom, but it introduces stream of consciousness as a literary method and broaches many subjects controversial to its day. As avant-garde as Ulysses was, Finnegans Wake is even more challenging to the reader as an important modernist work. Joyce died just two years after its publication, in 1941.

Robert Scholes is Research Professor of Modern Culture and Media at Brown University. He is the author of many books of literary theory.

Arthur Walton Litz, Jr. was born on October 31, 1929. He was an American literary historian and critic who served as professor of English Literature at Princeton University from 1956 to 1993. He is the author or editor of over twenty collections of literary criticism. Litz graduated from Princeton University in 1951 and received his Ph.D. from Oxford University while studying on a Rhodes Scholarship at Merton College in 1951-54. He became the Holmes Professor of English Literature at Princeton in 1956. He was named to the Eastman Visiting Professorship at Balliol College, Oxford in 1989. Bread Loaf professor from the early 1970s through the early 1990s and a literary historian and critic who served as professor of English literature at Princeton University from 1956 to 1993, Arthur Litz, Jr. died on June 4, 2014, at University Medical Center of Princeton in New Jersey.

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