The London Medical and Physical Journal (Google eBook)

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1823
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Page 299 - There is a partial insanity of mind, and a total insanity. The former is either in respect to things quoad hoc vel illud insanire. Some persons that have a competent use of reason in respect of some subjects, are yet under a particular dementia in respect of some particular discourses, subjects, or applications, or else it is partial in respect of degrees; and this is the condition of very many, especially melancholy...
Page 226 - A Practical Treatise on the Symptoms, Causes, Discrimination, and Treatment of some of the most Important Complaints that affect the Secretion and Excretion of the Urine.
Page 479 - ... either at the time of grinding, dressing, bolting, or manufacturing the same, or at any other time, any ingredient or mixture whatsoever not being the real and genuine produce of the corn or grain which shall be so ground ; or if any person...
Page 431 - I found that injury done to the anterior portion of the spinal marrow, convulsed the animal more certainly than injury done to the posterior portion; but I found it difficult to make the experiment without injuring both portions.
Page 297 - ... it becomes the subject of particular notice; and fond relatives are frequently deceived by the hope that it is only an abatement of excessive vivacity, conducing to a prudent reserve, and steadiness of character. A degree of apparent thoughtfulness and inactivity precede, together with a diminution of the ordinary curiosity, concerning that which is passing before them; and they therefore neglect those objects and pursuits which formerly proved sources of delight and instruction. The sensibility...
Page 438 - Illustration of Morbid Anatomy,' by a series of splendid engravings ; creditable at once to his own taste and liberality, and to the state of the arts in this country. He thus laid a solid foundation for pathology, and did for his profession what no physician had done before his time.
Page 127 - I will be brief. Your noble son is mad: Mad call I it — for to define true madness, What is"t, but to be nothing else but mad!
Page 262 - It was evidently transferred, in the state of vapour, from the plumbago of the other pole, and had been formed by the carbon taken from the hemispherical cavity. It was so different from the melted charcoal, described in my former communications, that its origin from the plumbago could admit of no reasonable doubt. I am now to state other appearances, which have excited in my mind a very deep interest.
Page 297 - The attack is almost imperceptible; some months usually elapse, before it becomes the subject of particular notice; and fond relatives are frequently deceived by the hope that it is only an abatement of excessive vivacity, conducing to a prudent reserve, and steadiness of character. A degree of apparent thoughtfulness and inactivity precede, together with a diminution of the ordinary curiosity, concerning that which is passing before them; and they therefore neglect those objects and pursuits which...
Page 329 - People may say this and that of being in jail; but for my part, I found Newgate as agreeable a place as ever I was in, in all my life.

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