Fifteen Sermons Preached at Rolls Chapel: To which is Added Six Sermons Preached on Publick Occasions

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J. and P. Knapton, 1749 - Sermons, English - 480 pages
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Page 310 - The secret things belong unto the LORD our God : but those things which are revealed belong unto us and to our children for ever, that we may do all the words of this law.
Page 177 - There were two men in one city; the one rich, and the other poor. The rich man had exceeding many flocks and herds : but the poor man had nothing, save one little ewe lamb, which he had bought and nourished up: and it grew up together with him, and with his children ; it did eat of his own meat, and drank of his own cup, and lay in his bosom and was unto him as a daughter.
Page 118 - And he took up his parable, and said, Balak the king of Moab hath brought me from Aram, out of the mountains of the east, saying, Come, curse me Jacob, and come, defy Israel.
Page 178 - And there came a traveller unto the rich man, and he spared to take of his own flock, and of his own herd, to dress for the wayfaring man that was come unto him, but took the poor man's lamb, and dressed it for the man that was come to him.
Page xl - I exhort therefore, that, first of all, supplications, prayers, intercessions, and giving of thanks, be made for all men; for kings, and for all that are in authority; that we may lead a quiet and peaceable life in all godliness and honesty.
Page 119 - Wherewith shall I come before the Lord, And bow myself before the high God? Shall I come before him with burnt-offerings, With calves of a year old ? Will the Lord be pleased with thousands of rams, Or with ten thousands of rivers of oil ? Shall I give my first-born for my transgression, The fruit of my body for the sin of my soul...
Page 142 - The indignation raised by cruelty and injustice, and the desire of having it punished, which persons unconcerned would feel, is by no means malice. No, it is resentment against vice and wickedness : it is one of the common bonds, by which society is held together; a fellow-feeling, which each individual has in behalf of the whole species, as well as of himself.
Page 257 - That which we more strictly call piety, or the love of God, and which is an essential part of a right temper, some may perhaps imagine no way connected with benevolence: yet surely they must be connected, if there be indeed in being an object infinitely...
Page ii - ... this idle way of reading and considering things. . By this means, time, even in solitude, is happily got rid of, without the pain of attention ^ Neither is any; part of it more put to the account of idleness, one can scarce forbear saying, -is spent with less thought, than great part of that which is spent in reading.
Page 312 - Our province is virtue and religion, life and manners; the science of improving the temper, and making the heart better. This is the field assigned us to cultivate: how much it has lain neglected is indeed astonishing.

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