Universal Geography: Or A Description of All Parts of the World, on a New Plan, According to the Great Natural Divisions of the Globe, Volume 2

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A. Finley, 1827 - Atlases
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Page 429 - ... layer. Sometimes the two crystallizations seem to choose separate localities in insulated parts of the same lake. This curious valley is only inhabited by Greek monks. Their four convents are at once their fortresses and their prisons. They subsist on a small quantity of leguminous seeds. The vegetation in these valleys has a wild and dreary aspect. The palms are mere bushes, and bear no fruit. Caravans come to this place in quesl of natron.
Page 275 - A singularly absurd custom takes place in this country in certain forms of political homage shown to a white elephant, a preternatural animal kept for the purpose, superbly lodged near the royal palace, sumptuously dressed and fed, provided with functionaries like a second sovereign, held next in rank to the king, and superior to the queen, and made to receive presents and other tokens of respect from foreign ambassadors.
Page 427 - On the very banks the slime is mixed with much sand, which it loses in proportion as it is carried farther from the river, so that at a certain distance it consists almost entirely of pure argil.
Page 62 - It is the principal island of a group of thirty-six, subject to the same monarch, and the seat of the government. The natives trace their history back to a period long anterior to the Christian era ; but their first communication with the rest of the world, when their accounts became fully corroborated and undisputed, was about the year 605, when they were invaded by China, who found them at that time — a time when England...
Page 62 - The island of Lewchew itself is situate in the happiest climate of the globe. — Refreshed by the sea-breezes, which, from its geographical position, blow over it at every period of the year, it is free from the extremes of heat and cold, which oppress many other countries ; whilst from the general configuration of the land, being more adapted to the production of rivers and...
Page 429 - Their banks and their waters are covered with crystallizations, both of muriate of soda, or sea salt, and of natron, or carbonate of soda. When a volume of water contains both of these salts, the muriate of soda is the first to crystallize ; and the carbonate of soda is then deposited in a separate layer. Sometimes the two crystallizations seem to choose separate localities in insulated parts of the same lake. ! This curious valley is only inhabited by Greek monks. Their four convents are at once...
Page 248 - Marawar, Pescaria and the coast of Malabar produce the finest cotton. The plant is cultivated in every part of India ; the finest grows in the light, rocky soil of Guzerat, Bengal, Oude and Agra. The cultivation of this plant is very lucrative, an acre producing about nine quintals of cotton annually."* In central Africa cotton has also been a staple growth time out of memory. It is mentioned by travelers as abundant on the banks of the Senegal, the Gambia and the Niger, at Timbuctoo, Sierre Leone,...
Page 296 - ... them are basaltic, often containing in their centres wide tunnels or cavities, and, at other times, round lakes which might be taken for ancient craters. Although the occurrence of volcanic substances has not, on satisfactory evidence, been every where ascertained, there has already been discovered a greater number of volcanoes than in any other part of the world. In the annals of early navigation these are sometimes mentioned as the most splendid appearances in nature ; while, on other occasions,...
Page 110 - Himalak mountains. This range is described by a celebrated geographer as follows: " That part which forms the northern boundary of India, is a continuation of the same range with that to the west of the Indus, known among the Afghans under the name of Hindoo...
Page 453 - ... his people, might erect such an edifice, to convince the Egyptians of his superiority of mind over the ancient kings of Egypt, even in religious devotion. This is the cabinet of the Egyptian arts, the product of study for many centuries, and it was here that Denon thought himself in the sanctuary of the arts and sciences. The front is adorned with a beautiful cornice, and a frieze covered with figures and hieroglyphics, over the centre of which the winged globe is predominant, and the two sides...

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