Stolen Harvest: The Hijacking of the Global Food Supply

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Zed Books, 2000 - Business & Economics - 146 pages
Examining the position of women in relation to nature - the forests, the food chain and water supplies - the author links the violaation of nature with the violation and marginalization of women in the Third World. One reult is that the impact of science, technology and politics, along with the workings of the economy itself, are inherently exploitative. Every area of human activity marginalizes and burdens both women and nature.There is only one path, Vandana Shiva suggests, to survival and liberation for nature, women and men, and that is the ecological path of harmony, sustainability and diversity. She explores the unique place of women in the environment of India in particular, both as its saviours and as victims of maldevelopment.Her analysis is an innovative statement of the challenge that women in ecology movements are creating and she shows how their efforts constitute a non-violent and humanly inclusive alternative to the dominant paradigm of contemporary scientific and development thought.
 

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I fell asleep reading the title alone.

Review: Stolen Harvest: The Hijacking of the Global Food Supply

User Review  - Angrysrilankan - Goodreads

I need to finish this book. It's kind of dense and heavy. I think I stopped reading it because it was easier not to have to deal with/face the content. Read full review

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Contents

INTRODUCTION
1
The Hijacking of the Global Food Supply
5
Soy Imperialism and the Destruction of Local Food Cultures
21
The Stolen Harvest under the Sea
37
Mad Cows and Sacred Cows
57
The Stolen Harvest of Seed
79
Genetic Engineering and Food Security
95
Reclaiming Food Democracy
117
AFTERWORD
125
INDEX
129
ABOUT THE AUTHOR
145
ABOUT ZED BOOKS
146
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About the author (2000)

Vandana Shiva is a world-renowned environmental thinker and campaigner. A former physicist, feminist and philosopher, she is prominent in citizens' actions against environmental destruction, and critical of the latest agricultural and genetic engineering technologies and the giant corporations which control them. A leader in the International Forum on Globalization along with Ralph Nader and Jeremy Rifkin, Vandana Shiva won the Alternative Nobel Peace Prize (the Right Livelihood Award) in 1993, and the Earth Day Award. In India she is Director of the Research Foundation for Science, Technology and Ecology. She is also the founder of Bija Vidyapeeth which offers conference and seminar facilities in an ambiance which reinvigorates our vital link with Nature at the Navdanya Biodiversity Conservation and Agroecology Farm in the foothills of the Himalayas.

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