Letters, Volume 1

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W. Heinemann, 1915 - Authors, Latin
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Melmonth's translation of Pliny's Letters, was first pub. in 1746. Pliny, the Younger is also know as Plinius Caecilius Secundus, Gaius.
 

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Page 477 - It was not at that distance discernible from what mountain this cloud issued, but it was found afterwards to ascend from Mount Vesuvius. I cannot give you a more exact description of its figure than by resembling it to that of a pinetree, for it shot up a great height in the form of a trunk, which extended itself at the top into a sort of branches...
Page 475 - Your request that I would send you an account of my uncle's death, in order to transmit a more exact relation of it to posterity, deserves my acknowledgments ; for, if this accident shall be celebrated by your pen, the glory of it, I am well assured, will be rendered for ever illustrious.
Page 495 - ... the screams of children, and the cries of men ; some calling for their children, others for their parents, others for their husbands, and only distinguishing each other by their voices ; one lamenting his own fate, another that of his family ; some wishing to die from the very fear of dying ; some lifting their hands to the gods ; but, the greater part imagining that the last and eternal night was come, which was to destroy the gods and the world together.
Page 481 - They went out then, having pillows tied upon their heads with napkins ; and this was their whole defence against the storm of stones that fell around them.
Page 495 - Nothing then was to be heard but the shrieks of women, the screams of children, and the cries of men, some calling for their children, others for their parents, others for their husbands, and only distinguishing each other by their voices ; one lamenting his own fate, another that of his family ; some wishing to die from the very fear of dying; some lifting their hands to the gods ; but the greater part imagining that the last and eternal night was come, which was to destroy the gods and the world...
Page 476 - Nubes, incertum procul intuentibus, ex quo monte (Vesuvium fuisse postea cognitum est), oriebatur, cuius similitudinem et formam non alia magis , arbor quam pinus expresserit. Nam longissimo velut trunco elata in altum quibusdam ramis diffundebatur...
Page 477 - Bassus, who was in the utmost alarm at the imminent danger which threatened her ; for her villa being situated at the foot of Mount Vesuvius, there was no way to escape but by sea : she earnestly entreated him, therefore, to come to her assistance. He accordingly changed his first design, and what he began with a philosophical, he pursued with an heroical turn of mind.
Page 366 - Thus having said, the gallant chiefs alight, Their hands they join, their mutual faith they plight ; Brave Glaucus then each narrow thought resign'd, (Jove warm'd his bosom, and enlarg'd his mind) For Diomed's brass arms, of mean device, For which nine oxen paid (a vulgar price), He gave his own, of gold divinely wrought, A hundred beeves the shining purchase bought.
Page 479 - ... presence of mind, as to be able to make and dictate his observations upon the motion and figure of that dreadful scene. ' He was now so nigh the mountain that the cinders, which grew thicker and hotter the nearer he approached, fell into the ships, together with pumicestones and black pieces of burning rock.
Page 491 - Though it was now morning, the light was exceedingly faint and languid ; the buildings all around us tottered, and though we stood upon open...

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