The Sir Roger de Coverley Papers: From "The Spectator"

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Ginn, 1899 - English essays - 178 pages
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I highly recommend this work as it is not only highly entertaining but the style in which it is written is very fine. It is a pleasure to read and I could suggest no finer example of English for the writer and speaker to emulate. Read full review

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Page 161 - Sing unto the LORD with thanksgiving; sing praise upon the harp unto our God: 8 who covereth the heaven with clouds, who prepareth rain for the earth, who maketh grass to grow upon the mountains. 9 He giveth to the beast his food, and to the young ravens which cry.
Page xxvii - It was said of Socrates that he brought Philosophy down from heaven, to inhabit among men ; and I shall be ambitious to have it said of me, that I have brought Philosophy out of closets and libraries, schools and colleges, to dwell in clubs and assemblies, at tea-tables and in coffeehouses.
Page 134 - ... find out fit mate, but such As some misfortune brings him, or mistake ; Or whom he wishes most shall seldom gain, Through her perverseness, but shall see her...
Page 46 - ... than blemish his good qualities. As soon as the sermon is finished, nobody presumes to stir till Sir Roger is gone out of the church. The knight walks down from his seat in the chancel between a double row of his tenants, that stand bowing to him on each side : and every now and then inquires how...
Page 41 - The ideas of goblins and sprights have really no more to do with darkness than light : yet let but a foolish maid inculcate these often on the mind of a child, and raise them there together, possibly , he shall never be able to separate them again so long as he lives ; but darkness shall ever afterwards bring with it those frightful ideas, and they shall be so joined, that he can no more bear the one than the other...
Page 6 - But being ill-used by the above-mentioned widow, he was very serious for a year and a half ; and though, his temper being naturally jovial, he at last got over it, he grew careless of himself, and never dressed afterwards. He continues to wear a coat and doublet of the same cut that were in fashion at the time of his repulse...
Page 25 - I am the more at ease in Sir Roger's family, because it consists of sober and staid persons; for .as the knight is the best master in the world, he seldom changes his servants; and as he is beloved by all about him, his servants never care for leaving him : by this means his Domestics are all in years, and grown old with their master. You would take his valet...
Page 46 - Sometimes he will be lengthening out a verse in the singing psalms, half a minute after the rest of the congregation have done with it; sometimes when he is pleased with the matter of his devotion, he pronounces
Page 3 - Thus I live in the world rather as a spectator of mankind than as one of the species...
Page 1 - I have observed that a reader seldom peruses a book with pleasure till he knows whether the writer of it be a black or a fair man, of a mild or choleric disposition, married or a bachelor; with other particulars of a like nature, that conduce very much to the right understanding of an author.

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