The Physics of Superheroes: Spectacular Second Edition

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Penguin, Nov 3, 2009 - Social Science - 448 pages
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A complete update to the hit book on the real physics at work in comic books, featuring more heroes, more villains, and more science 

Since 2001, James Kakalios has taught "Everything I Needed to Know About Physics I Learned from Reading Comic Books," a hugely popular university course that generated coast-to-coast media attention for its unique method of explaining complex physics concepts through comics. With The Physics of Superheroes, named one of the best science books of 2005 by Discover, he introduced his colorful approach to an even wider audience. Now Kakalios presents a totally updated, expanded edition that features even more superheroes and findings from the cutting edge of science. With three new chapters and completely revised throughout with a splashy, redesigned package, the book that explains why Spider-Man's webbing failed his girlfriend, the probable cause of Krypton's explosion, and the Newtonian physics at work in Gotham City is electrifying from cover to cover.
 

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Brain food
Great book. Most of the book is explain pretty simply for those who know nothing of the subject. Never felt overwhelmed with information. Only complaint is lack of "read aloud''

Contents

Chapter 1UPUP AND AWAYFORCES AND MOTION
THE DAY GWEN STACY DIEDIMPULSE AND MOMENTUM
IF THIS BE MY DENSITYPROPERTIES OF MATTER
THE CENTRAL CITYDIET PLANCONSERVATION
HOW THE MONSTROUS MENACE OF THE MYSTERIOUS
Chapter 17 SUPERMAN SCHOOLS SPIDERMANELECTRICAL CURRENTS Chapter 18 HOW ELECTRO BECOMES MAGNETO WHENHERUN...
Chapter 21JOURNEYINTOTHE MICROVERSEATOMIC PHYSICS
Chapter 23THROUGH A WALL LIGHTLYTUNNELING PHENOMENA
THE COSTUMES ARE SUPER TOOMATERIALS SCIENCE
SECTION4 WHAT HAVEWE LEARNED?
Acknowledgements
Copyright

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About the author (2009)

James Kakalios is a professor in the School of Physics and Astronomy at the University of Minnesota, where he has taught since 1988, and where his class "Everything I Needed to Know About Physics I Learned from Reading Comic Books" is a popular freshman seminar. He received his Ph.D. in 1985 from the University of Chicago, and has been reading comic books for much longer.

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