Automotive Lighting and Human Vision

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Springer Science & Business Media, Mar 13, 2007 - Technology & Engineering - 410 pages
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It is possible to buy excellent books on human vision as well as about automotive lighting. Unfortunately, these books have little or no common content. But in fact these fields do overlap. Providing optimal conditions for human vision is what automotive lighting is all about. Our motivation for writing this book arises from interdisciplinary st- ies of human vision and lighting. Initially we intended the book to provide background information on human vision to engineers working in auto- tive lighting. At the same time we planned to introduce basic concepts of automotive lighting to experts in human vision. However because of the intricate connections between human vision and automotive lighting, it turns out that the book provides new insights to anyone interested in either or both subjects. The subject matter is complex and spans a number of disciplines from psychology to mechatronics. Hence there are very few individuals who are experts in all fields. Looking at the nature of human vision, it is surprising to find out how much every one of us takes it for granted. Rarely are we aware of how we use vision predominantly to verify our internal model of our surroundings. Many accidents, particularly at night, stem from the fact that our internal model misrepresented a significant part of our surrou- ings. Taking knowledge on human vision into account in the design of - ture automotive lighting systems reduces the risk of accidents at night.
 

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Excellent book! I used this book as a reference for my M.S. thesis and also for my job at a OEM car lighting company.

Selected pages

Contents

1 Introduction
1
2 How Vision Constructs Reality
7
211 Constructing shape and depth
10
212 Constructing shading and colour
16
213 Constructing objects and their parts
23
214 Limits of attention
29
22 Models of visual perception
33
222 Vision as bayesian inference
41
4 Fundamental Problems with Automotive Lighting
262
412 Performance in mesopic vision
265
413 Implications for practice
270
414 Mesopic vision Conclusion
272
42 Glare
273
422 The quantification of glare
277
423 Performance in the presence of glare
280
424 Recovery from glare
290

223 Vision evolution and user interface
43
23 Visual structure and capabilities
48
232 Continuous adjustments of the visual system
60
233 Visual capabilities
72
234 Conclusions
93
3 Automotive Lighting State of the Art
95
31 Headlamps
96
311 Installation and function
97
312 Optical concepts
100
313 Design aspects of headlamps
116
314 Quality in development and production
121
315 Day and night appearance
142
316 Advanced front lighting
146
317 Night vision systems
153
32 Rear and signal lights
159
321 Installation and functions
160
322 Design concepts
162
323 Optical concepts
163
324 Styling freedom
171
325 Adaptive signal lights
184
33 Interior lighting
185
332 Filling space with light and colour
196
333 Special light sources
197
334 Control systems
199
34 Everchanging technologies for luminaires
201
342 Electronics for lighting
215
343 Materials for lighting
221
35 Updating standards
245
425 Behaviour in glare
292
426 Glare in practice
294
427 Xenon and halogen headlights
295
428 Conclusion
298
5 Automotive Lighting and Mechatronics
301
512 Technology push
307
514 The promises of active lighting systems
308
52 Automotive lighting systems from the perspective of mechatronics
309
522 System structure of classical headlamp systems
311
523 Mechatronic systems
314
524 Basic system structures for automotive lighting
315
Improving passive lighting by adding just a little touch of mechatronics
323
532 Headlamp levelling
324
533 Dynamic bending
329
534 Interior light control
334
535 Lighting bus and wiring
340
541 Sensors and sensor systems for active lighting
341
542 Actuators for active lighting
347
543 Functional structures and functions of active lighting systems
356
544 Active signal lights
371
55 Adding additional channels of perception
379
56 Active lighting or additional displays? The principle of immediacy
385
57 Lighting future
386
571 Rating of lighting systems
387
572 Recommendations
390
6 References
395
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About the author (2007)

Burkard Wördenweber obtained his PhD in computer science at Cambridge University, England. He headed Hella's Corporate R&D and founded the L-LAB. He is an honorary Professor at Paderborn University. Since 2004 he is in charge of Advanced Engineering at Visteon. He has published a number of books on Innovation Management.

Jörg Wallaschek received his PhD from the Technische Hochschule Darmstadt, Germany. He is Professor of Mechatronics and Dynamics at the University of Paderborn and founded the L-LAB where he acts as chairman for the university partners.

Peter Boyce received his PhD from the University of Reading, England. He has been active in the field of lighting research for many years, in both the UK and the USA. He is Professor Emeritus at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute and author of Human Factors in Lighting.

Donald Hoffman obtained his PhD at MIT. He is Professor of Cognitive Science at the University of California, and author of Visual Intelligence: How We Create What We See. He received the Distinguished Scientific Award of the American Psychological Association, and the Troland Award of the National Academy of Sciences.