University Arithmetic, Embracing the Science of Numbers, and General Rules for Their Application

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A.S. Barnes & Company, 1869
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Page 177 - To multiply a decimal by 10, 100, 1000, &c., remove the decimal point as many places to the right as there are ciphers in the multiplier ; and if there be not places enough in the number, annex ciphers.
Page 145 - Multiply the numerators together for a new numerator, and the denominators together for a new denominator.
Page 417 - Thirty days hath September, April, June, and November ; All the rest have thirty-one, Except the second month alone, Which has but twenty-eight, in fine, Till leap year gives it twenty-nine.
Page 15 - ... one two three four five six seven eight nine ten eleven twelve thirteen fourteen fifteen sixteen seventeen eighteen nineteen twenty thirty forty fifty sixty seventy eighty ninety one hundred two hundred three hundred four hundred five hundred...
Page 111 - The Greatest Common Divisor of two or more numbers is the greatest number that will exactly divide each of them. Thu4, 18 is the greatest, common divisor of 36 and 54, since it is the greatest number that will divide each of them without a remainder.
Page 474 - This work is by a practical teacher and a practical book-keeper. It is of a thoroughly popular class, and will be welcomed by every one who loves to see theory and practice combined in an easy, concise, and methodical form. The Single Entry portion is well adapted to supply a want felt in nearly all' other treatises, which seem to be prepared mainly for the use of wholesale merchants, leaving retailers, mechanics, farmers, etc., who transact the greater portion of the business of the country, without...
Page 109 - The Least Common Multiple of two or more numbers is the least number which is a multiple of each of them; thus, 12 is the least common multiple of 2, 3, and 4.
Page 326 - Multiply the divisor, thus increased, by the last figure of the root; subtract the product from the dividend, and to the remainder bring down the next period for a new dividend. 5. Double the whole root already found for a new divisor, and continue the operation as before, until all the periods are brought down.
Page 280 - RULE. Divide the given sum by the amount of $1. for the given rate and time ; and the quotient will be the present worth.
Page 123 - If both terms of a fraction be multiplied by the same number, the value of the fraction will not be changed.

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