An account of Tunis: of its government, manners, customs, and antiquities; especially of its productions, manufactures, and commerce

Front Cover
Longman, Hurst, Rees, Orme, and Brown, 1811 - Tunisia - 187 pages
0 Reviews
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 90 - Tunisines have a curious custom of fattening up their young ladies for marriage. A girl, after she is betrothed, is cooped up in a small room; shackles of silver and gold are put upon her ancles and wrists, as a piece of dress.
Page 69 - The remains of an excessive aqueduct, which supplied Carthage with water from the mountains of Zawan, a circuitous distance of sixty miles, (the direct line being little more than half that distance,) can still easily be traced from the mouth of the cistern, until lost among the mountains. The cisterns are still to be seen. Those which received the water from the aqueduct are now become the habitations of those miserable Bedouins, who remain in this part of the country. — The whole of the ancient...
Page 40 - But though this maxim has been much followed by those who have hitherto dealt with them, yet honesty is certainly the best policy ; and a man on his guard against their weak arts, will render them entirely futile, by a systematic determination to act with uniform integrity himself, and never, in any degree, to submit to imposition from them. Before talents and integrity, accompanied with vigilance and resolution, the minds of the cunning and unprincipled will almost always crouch or shrink, baffled...
Page 38 - No favour must be granted, but in lieu of something equivalent, and not until it has been repeatedly requested ; even then, it should only be granted with reluctance. Should you stand in need of any thing which they can construe into a favour, it may be set down as a rule, that...
Page 90 - If she is to be married to a man who has discharged, dispatched, or lost a former wife, the shackles which the former wife wore, are put upon the new bride's limbs, and she is fed until they are filled up to the proper thickness. The food used for this custom, worthy of barbarians, is a seed called...
Page 70 - ... thrown into them by the rains of many Centuries, may yet be followed under ground to a great extent. The whole of the site of ancient Carthage, indeed, is occupied by similar excavations — denoting that one town has been built on the scattered fragments of another much more magnificent. A short while ago an edifice was discovered, consisting of several apartments, in a tolerably perfect state, and having good paintings on the roof of one of the rooms. The adjoining fields, too, are sprinkled...
Page 62 - Hamooda was willing to expend so much labour and wealth. The climate of Tunis is one of the finest in the world, and admirably adapted for the production of most of those articles which, for the supply of Europe, are brought from an immense distance. All the coast of Barbary is capable of bearing cotton, sugar, and spices of almost every kind. Indigo and silk might also be procured with a little care. The soil, too, throughout the whole state, is remarkably good, and, with scarcely any cultivation,...
Page 90 - This is sometimes no easy matter, particularly if the former wife was fat, and the present should be of a slender form. The food used for this custom, worthy of barbarians, is a seed called drough; which is of an extraordinary fattening quality, and also famous for rendering the milk of nurses rich and abundant. With this seed, and their national dish 'cuscusul the bride is literally crammed, and many actually die under the spoon."98 MOROCCO.
Page 77 - And an unfortunate husband imploring the ransom of his wife, is answered in the same unprincipled unfeeling manner, ' what, are women so scarce in my dominions ?' The number of slaves in Tunis, belonging to this prince, amounts to nearly two thousand ; and let it be confessed with shame and sorrow, that upwards of one hundred of them have been taken, navigating under the protection of British passports. In vain has the Consul of his Britannic Majesty used his efforts for their relief. While his endeavours...
Page 167 - France rendercd the intercourse more easy; and enabled the French both to study the taste, and with that versatility of character for which they are so remarkable, to accommodate themselves to all the manners and customs of the Moors.

Bibliographic information