Patton's Concise History of the American People: From the Discoveries of the Continent to 1876, the Centennial Year of the Nation's Independence, Giving a Clear Account of Their Political, Military, Moral, Industrial and Commercial Life

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J.B. Ford & Company, 1876 - United States - 1018 pages
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Contents

First Voyage to 57 Explorations of John Smith 58 The Churoh
63
CHAPTER XL
73
A Company organized Settlement of Salem 75 The Charter trans
94
COLONIZATION OF NEW YORK
112
Hudsons Discoveries 112 A Change wrought 113 The Fort
126
CHAPTER XIV
130
CHAPTER XV
141
CHAPTER XVI
156
CHAPTER XVII
167
COMMOTION IN NEW YORKWITCHCRAFT IN MASSACHUSETTS
182
Leister acting Governor of New York 182 The Old Council refuses
189
MISSIONS AND SETTLEMENTS IN NEW FRANCE
196
CHAPTER XX
208
CHAPTER XXI
225
FRENCH AND INDIAN WARCONTINUED
243
The French AcadiensTheir Industry and good Morals 245 Their
255
CHAPTER XXIV
273
Restrictions of Trade and ManufacturesTaxes Imposed by Parlia
281
CHAPTER XXVI
295
The English Ministry determine to obtain a Revenue 295 Massa
304
The Spirit of the People 311 They seize Guns and Ammunition
312
to Storm the TownDeath of Montgomery din Arnold in
327
Battle of Bunker Hill 328 Death of WarrenGenerals Charles
337
CHAPTER XXIX
344
CHAPTER XXX
364
The Question of Independence Iulluences in favor of 364 The ToriesCommon Sense 366 The Declaration its Reception
381
CHAPTER XXXI
387
DiscouragementsHowes Proclamation 387 Affairs on LakeChnm
399
at Brunswick 401 Putnam at Princeton 402 Illtreatment
409
The Struggle excites an Interest in England and France 410 Pri vateers fitted out in France 411 Munitions of War 412 Howes
419
CHAPTER XXXIII
428
CHAPTER XXXIV
440
Sufferings at Valley Forge 440 England disappointedConciliatory
450
WAR OF THE REVOLUTIONCONTINUED
457
CHAPTER XXXVI
466

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Page 1007 - The Congress shall have Power to dispose of and make all needful Rules and Regulations respecting the Territory or other Property belonging to the United States ; and nothing in this Constitution shall be so construed as to Prejudice any Claims of the United States, or of any particular State. SECTION 4. The United States shall guarantee to every State in this Union a Republican Form of Government, and shall protect each of them against Invasion, and on Application of the Legislature, or of the Executive...
Page 517 - I consider it as an indispensable duty to close this last solemn act of my official life, by commending the interests of our dearest country to the protection of Almighty God, and those who have the superintendence of them to his holy keeping.
Page 1005 - States, and a Majority of all the States shall be necessary to a Choice. In every Case, after the Choice of the President, the Person having the greatest Number of Votes of the Electors shall be the Vice President. But if there should remain two or more who have equal Votes, the Senate shall chuse from them by Ballot the Vice President. The Congress may determine the Time of chusing the Electors, and the Day on which they shall give their Votes; which Day shall be the same throughout the United States.
Page 998 - Trust or Profit under the United States : but the Party convicted shall nevertheless be liable and subject to Indictment, Trial, Judgment and Punishment, according to Law. SECTION 4. >The Times, Places and Manner of holding Elections for Senators and Representatives, shall be prescribed in each State by the Legislature thereof; but the Congress may at any time by Law make or alter such Regulations, except as to the places of chusing Senators.
Page 1009 - Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press ; or the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the Government for a redress of grievances.
Page 521 - I have lived, Sir, a long time, and the longer I live, the more convincing proofs I see of this truth — that God governs in the affairs of men. And if a sparrow cannot fall to the ground without his notice, is it probable that an empire can rise without his aid ? We have been assured, Sir, in the sacred writings, that " except the Lord build the house they labor in vain that build it.
Page 958 - The result of the last week must convince you of the hopelessness of further resistance on the part of the army of Northern Virginia in this struggle. I feel that it is so, and regard it as my duty to shift from myself the responsibility of any further effusion of blood, by asking of you the surrender of that portion of the Confederate States army known as the army of Northern Virginia.
Page 251 - The supplicating tears of the women, and moving petitions of the men, melt me into such deadly sorrow, that I solemnly declare, if I know my own mind, I could offer myself a willing sacrifice to the butchering enemy, provided that would contribute to the people's ease.
Page 449 - I am not worth purchasing; but such as I am, the king of Great Britain is not rich enough to do it.
Page 288 - ... on many occasions has caused the blood of those sons of liberty...

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