A practical treatise on diseases of the skin

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printed for Thomas and George Underwood, 1824
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Page 326 - In the hospitals appropriated to the reception of such cases, the Pellagrosi afford a melancholy spectacle of physical and moral suffering, such as I have rarely had occasion to witness elsewhere. These unhappy objects seem under the influence of an invincible despondency ; they seek to be alone ; scarcely answer the questions put to them ; and often shed tears without any obvious cause. Their faculties and senses become alike impaired ; and the progress of the disease, where it does not carry them...
Page 258 - ... an extreme itching, with some sense of heat ; and on examining the prepuce, he finds one, or sometimes two, red patches, about the size of a silver penny, upon which are clustered five or six minute transparent vesicles, which, from their extreme tenuity, appear of the same red hue as the base on which they stand. In the course of twenty-four or thirty hours, the vesicles enlarge, and become of a milky hue, having lost their transparency ; and on the third day they are coherent, and assume an...
Page 200 - I have tried lime-juice, hair-powder, and a variety of external applications, with little or no benefit ; in short, the only means which I ever saw productive of any good effect in mitigating its violence, till the constitution got assimilated to the climate, were, light clothing, temperance in eating and drinking, avoiding all exercise in the heat of the day, open bowels, and last, not least, a determined resolution to resist with stoical apathy its first attacks. To sit quiet and unmoved under...
Page 258 - If no irritant be applied, the slight ulceration continues till the ninth or tenth day nearly unchanged, and then begins to heal, which process is completed by the twelfth, and the scabs fall off on the thirteenth or fourteenth day. " When the patches occur, however, on the exterior portion of the prepuce, or where that part does not cover the glans, the duration of the eruption is shortened, and ulceration does not actually take place. The contents of the vesicles begin to dry about the sixth day,...
Page 321 - The local symptoms very generally shew themselves in the first instance, early in the spring, at the period when the mid-day heat is rapidly increasing, and when the peasants are most actively engaged in their labours in the fields. The patient perceives on the back of his hands, on his feet, and sometimes, but more rarely, on other parts of the body exposed to the sun, certain red spots or blotches ; which gradually extend themselves, with a slight elevation of the cuticle, and a shining surface,...
Page 199 - ... as tea, soup, or wine, than the pimples become elevated, so as to be distinctly seen, and but too sensibly felt ! " Prickly heat, being merely a symptom, not a cause of good health, its disappearance has been erroneously accused of producing much mischief; hence the early writers on tropical diseases, harping on the old string of ' humoral pathology', speak very seriously of the danger of repelling, and the advantage of ' encouraging the eruption, by taking small warm liquors, as tea, coffees,...
Page 358 - The eczema is characterized by an eruption of small vesicles, on various parts of the skin, usually set close or crowded together, with little or no inflammation round their bases, and unattended by fever.
Page 200 - Indeed, I never saw it even repelled by the cold bath ; and in my own case, as well as in many others, it rather seemed to aggravate the eruption and disagreeable sensations, especially during the glow which succeeded the immersion. It certainly disappears suddenly, sometimes on the accession of other diseases, but I never had reason to suppose, that its disappearance occasioned them.
Page 149 - Phlyzacium; a pustule commonly of a large size raised on a hard circular base, of a vivid red colour, and succeeded by a thick, hard, dark-coloured scab.
Page 197 - From mosquitoes, cock-roaches, ants, and the numerous other tribes of depredators on our personal property, we have some defence by night, and, in general, a respite by day ; but this unwelcome guest assails us at all, and particularly the most unseasonable hours. Many a time have I been forced to spring from table and abandon the repast, which I had scarcely touched, to writhe about in the open air, for a quarter of an hour : and often have I returned to the charge, with no better success, against...

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